Water tips - Maryland

Water analysis, treatment, and mineral recipes for optimum taste and equipment health.
trunks235

#1: Post by trunks235 »

Hi all,

Recently purchased a linea mini expected to arrive in June/July. That being said, I want to be extra cautious with what water I use Anyone in the Maryland area have tips for me? I live in Elkridge if that helps.

Thanks!

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slybarman

#2: Post by slybarman »

I'm near Annapolis and the municipal water here is very soft and barely needs treatment if at all, but every municipality is going to be different. Call your local water management and get the numbers and then folks here can tell you what, if anything, you need.

My numbers here were:

Hardness: 40-55 mg/L or 2-3 grains per gallon (my own testing with strips gave 25 mg/L but that was after running through the refrigerator EveryDrop filter)
Alkalinity: 30-40 mg/L calcium carbonate
Chlorides: 4 ppm or 4 mg/L sodium
PH: 7.5-8

trunks235

#3: Post by trunks235 »

I'll do that and report back!

mtbizzle

#4: Post by mtbizzle »

If you want to be "extra careful" and don't care about care about adding some time, you could do the distilled water + concentrates method to get a "brewing water' of the 'hardness' and 'buffer' level that you want -- https://www.baristahustle.com/blog/diy- ... pes-redux/

I recently heard Scott Rao say he has had great success with this approach to water, and that as long as you use Magnesium and no calcium in your water, you won't get as much of the buildup in espresso machines.

emradguy
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#5: Post by emradguy »

Another option if you want to mix your own...

https://thirdwavewater.com/

I'd suggest buying some testing gear for your water...at least something to check alkalinity. If you get the LM test kit (available from Espressoparts) and run the tests, you can plug the results in on their "LM Home" site and get a treatment recommendation there.

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homeburrero
Team HB

#6: Post by homeburrero »

If you go with mixing your own water, the simplest, and also the most cautious approach with respect to machine health is the 100 mg/L potassium bicarbonate recipe, AKA the rpavlis recipe. (rpavlis was the HB username of the late Robert Pavlis - chemistry professor who posted often with tons of sage advice about chemistry, corrosion, physics, and home lever machines.)

It gives you good alkalinity to protect against corrosion, nothing that could deposit as scale, and nothing (no citrate, sulfate, chloride, etc) that might possibly be objectionable. It has potassium, but you already have much much more of that in the coffee itself. And it has bicarbonate, which is needed to keep the water from being corrosive, and is at a level that won't overly buffer and affect the taste of an espresso brew.

It's discussed in many places in this water forum - here's one example with an easy concentrate recipe. Water recommendation. If you have a 5 gallon jug and a scale the simplest approach is to weigh out about 1.9 of potassium bicarbonate and add it to 5 gallons of purified (RO, distilled, de-ionized) water. Give the jug a shake and let it sit a while (potassium bicarb dissolves very readily.)
Pat
nínádiishʼnahgo gohwééh náshdlį́į́h

nirdvorai
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#7: Post by nirdvorai »

homeburrero wrote: If you have a 5 gallon jug and a scale the simplest approach is to weigh out about 1.9 of potassium bicarbonate and add it to 5 gallons of purified (RO, distilled, de-ionized) water. Give the jug a shake and let it sit a while (potassium bicarb dissolves very readily.)
1.9 grams or lb.?

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homeburrero
Team HB

#8: Post by homeburrero »

1.9 grams per 5 gallons (oops, forgot the g)
Pat
nínádiishʼnahgo gohwééh náshdlį́į́h

nirdvorai
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#9: Post by nirdvorai »

Thanks