Water softening solution for La Marzocco Linea Mini

Water analysis, treatment, and mineral recipes for optimum taste and equipment health.
Jonathan02

#1: Post by Jonathan02 »

Hi,

I've bought a La Marzocco Linea Mini and am currently looking for a water softening solution to my tap water. Unfortunately, my water at home is hard and also contain high amount of Chloride - please see below water breakdown:

Chloride - 177 ppm
Total Hardness - greater than 400 ppm
Ph - 8 ppm
Total Alkalinity - greater than 240 ppm
Free Chlorine + Total Chlorine - 0 ppm
Total Iron - 0ppm
TDS - N/A (weren't able to measure yet)

According to the official La Marzocco calculator based on the above the suggested solution is:

Reverse Osmosis with Remineraliz (with P and C)
P = particulate filter
C = carbon filter

Calculator link: https://techcenter.lamarzocco.com/jsp/T ... ulator.jsp

I would really like to hear from you based on the data above what your water softening recommendation is for my case.

Possible solutions:

1. Using BWT Bestmax protect filter - I'm not sure if this will work due to the high Chloride. What is your input on this for my specific case?

2. Water softener - an example of such a product can be found here:
https://www.bertazzofood.com/en/product ... r-dva-lt8/


I'm not sure if this will work due to the high Chloride. What is your input on this for my specific case?

3. Reverse osmosis - my concern with this solution is that the water will not be in the suggested range that La Marzocco recommends which is:
T.D.S. [ppm] - 90-150ppm
Total Hardness - 70-100ppm
Ph-6.5-8ppm
Total Alkalinity - 40-80ppm

In case you'd recommend a Reverse Osmosis solution I'll be really happy to hear why and how I can get to the suggested range above. Also, I would like to know if Remineralize is mandatory and if so why. If you can also recommend a specific model to be installed at home this will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

mgwolf
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#2: Post by mgwolf »

I am not a water specialist, but you can get good water using the R Pavlis formula on distilled H20. 0.4 gm potassium bicarb per gallon (approx 4 liters) of distilled water. This will be much cheaper than an RO system or a whole house water softener. In the US, distilled water is fairly cheap. I actually use RO water (TDS=25) with potassium bicarb. in my Mini. Originally I was using a La Marzocco recommended brand of bottled water and after 6-9 months noticed some buildup in the clear water line from the reservoir. People here who have used the Pavlis formula for many years report zero build-up of deposits in their machines. I have descaled machines in the past and it's a royal pain.

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homeburrero
Team HB

#3: Post by homeburrero »

Jonathan02 wrote:Possible solutions:

1. Using BWT Bestmax protect filter - I'm not sure if this will work due to the high Chloride. What is your input on this for my specific case?
2. Water softener - an example of such a product can be found here:
https://www.bertazzofood.com/en/product ... r-dva-lt8/

I'm not sure if this will work due to the high Chloride. What is your input on this for my specific case?
The BWT bestprotect and that manual DVA are both conventional strong acid cation exchange softeners. Would dramatically reduce your hardness but not the alkalinity. Trouble here is that they would do nothing to reduce the chloride, and that is your big concern. They might be useful in front of a RO unit to reduce the hardness and protect the membrane from scale fouling. Most RO systems advise about whether water needs to be softened prior to the RO. For that the DVA would be much more economical but more work.

Jonathan02 wrote:3. Reverse osmosis - my concern with this solution is that the water will not be in the suggested range that La Marzocco recommends which is:
T.D.S. [ppm] - 90-150ppm
Total Hardness - 70-100ppm
Ph-6.5-8ppm
Total Alkalinity - 40-80ppm

In case you'd recommend a Reverse Osmosis solution I'll be really happy to hear why and how I can get to the suggested range above. Also, I would like to know if Remineralize is mandatory and if so why. If you can also recommend a specific model to be installed at home this will be greatly appreciated.
A remin cartridge would not get you there, but I don't think that should worry you. You would end up with something more like soft Seattle water that is also below these conventionally recommended numbers, and many people and coffee shops do fine brewing espresso with Seattle water. Also, note that the favorite DIY water recipe of users on this site that follow this water forum is by far the R Pavlis recipe, which has zero hardness minerals. (Poll: What DIY Water Recipes Do You Use for Espresso?)

A fancy RO system with a TDS monitor and a blending valve could get you closer to that spec, but the blending would add some undesirable chloride, maybe as much as 30 mg/L if you dialed it in to 40+ alkalinity.
Pat
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