Water concentrate added to finished shot

Water analysis, treatment, and mineral recipes for optimum taste and equipment health.
Earthy

#1: Post by Earthy »

I use RPavlis water in my Decent, but sometimes I still struggle with overly acidic espressos. Someone mentioned in another forum a while back that a strategy is to add a concentrate using a dropper right into the finished shot to dampen the acidity. The benefit of this being that you don't need to worry about running it through the machine and scaling.

I know I could extract the shot longer, but I wonder if this is something that people actually do. Could you share your concentrate formula if you have one? This seems like an elegant solution in theory, as you could add as many drops as needed for a particular coffee.

Thanks!

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Jeff
Team HB

#2: Post by Jeff »

Which grinder and burrs?

You can put probably find some videoed Zoom calls from a couple years ago where Damian talks about squirting "barista water". I prefer not to further dilute my espresso.

Many of the light-roast fans with certain burr sets have gravitated to a relatively high buffer, low GH mix and just use it in the tray.

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homeburrero
Team HB

#3: Post by homeburrero »

Earthy wrote:I use RPavlis water in my Decent, but sometimes I still struggle with overly acidic espressos. Someone mentioned in another forum a while back that a strategy is to add a concentrate using a dropper right into the finished shot to dampen the acidity. The benefit of this being that you don't need to worry about running it through the machine and scaling.

I know I could extract the shot longer, but I wonder if this is something that people actually do. Could you share your concentrate formula if you have one? This seems like an elegant solution in theory, as you could add as many drops as needed for a particular coffee.
I think the OP found and posted to this topic: Anyone try Baca drops for a water recipe? which is related to his question here, and I responded to that one yesterday. I'm of the opinion that if you're wanting to tame the perceived acidity and sourness, you could add a bicarbonate alkalinity (aka buffer) concentrate to the finished shot. In that other post I link to a Lance Hedrick and Samo Smrke video that contains a very brief discussion about adding minerals to the coffee after brewing.

With respect to how much alkalinity you might add, there is a big difference between espresso and pourover. For a typical 15:1 brew ratio pourover coffee, the buffering affect of a given water alkalinity is over 7x the effect it would have on a 2:1 ratio espresso. This is nicely discussed in a Marco Wellinger article a few years back -- Water and Coffee Acidity: How to Adapt Your Water for Different Extraction Methods - 25 Magazine, Issue 9 .
Pat
nínádiishʼnahgo gohwééh náshdlį́į́h

iyayy

#4: Post by iyayy »

simply adding few mls of water can help spread the flavor and acid to be perceptively less intense and less overwhelming, allowing more taste to be discerned easily.

i sometimes do this when i want a lighter shot, or taste test complexity of my dialling. usually i pull a 12g > 27ml shot light roasts, and teaspoon a small amount of hot water to the shot.. roughly 2-5ml. there's always extra hot water group flush anyways.

Earthy (original poster)

#5: Post by Earthy (original poster) »

Yes, thanks Pat for posting the specific recipe in that other thread. Since it didn't have many responses, I guess its not common practice. Seems like a simple solution (ahem) to a complex problem.