Too Many Water Filter Options

Water analysis, treatment, and mineral recipes for optimum taste and equipment health.
Fore
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#1: Post by Fore »

I live in Portland OR with great water: Chlorine is 2.2-2.5ppm, and total hardness is 7-49 and alkalinity is 30-72 mg/l (varies time of yr).

Our house burned down last mos, and it's giving me an opportunity to rebuild with a plumbed in espresso machine. I'm trying to set budgets, and would love any suggestions for good tasting water filtration that won't break the bank ;)

Thanks so much!
Fore

Pressino
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#2: Post by Pressino »

Any basic under sink drinking water filter should work...it will take care of particulates and annoying chemicals like chloramine and improve the taste.

DeuxInfuso
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#3: Post by DeuxInfuso »

Hmmm, chlorine should not exceed 1 ppm in a municipal water supply... you might want to report that to your utility. The good news is all you may need is an inexpensive carbon filter that will reduce chlorine to nearly zero, but will need to be replaced regularly. A small filter perhaps twice a year, a larger one annually.

--Deuxinfuso

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homeburrero
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#4: Post by homeburrero »

I agree with others that all you need in Portland is a particulates and a charcoal or carbon block filter to handle chlorine/choramine. Portland does use chloramine, which is harder to filter. A larger filter or a filter certified to be effective in chloramine removal might be a good idea if you have a problem with chloramine and taste. For flexibility and economy you might consider a system with one or two generic 10" housings. Then you are not locked into one filter brand and can choose from a variety of generic replacement filters.

Portland normally uses very soft 100% Bull Run water, but may occasionally shift to blending harder groundwater. You can use an inexpensive TDS conductivity meter to check for that. The Bull Run water will run about 35 ppm, but a 60% groundwater mix would kick it up to 90 ppm. Over time, their use of groundwater is low enough that you should not have any limescale issues with Portland water. Their treatment plant uses sodium carbonate to assure a non-corrosive pH with a good alkalinity.

DeuxInfuso wrote:chlorine should not exceed 1 ppm in a municipal water supply.
Portland water says its target value for total residual chlorine is 2.2 - 2.5 ppm as Cl2. EPA MCLs are 4 ppm.
Pat
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DeuxInfuso
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#5: Post by DeuxInfuso »

Pat,
thanks for researching the Portland chlorination targets, possibly higher due to apparent surface water source, and large distribution network. In Nevada, for groundwater, in smaller rural towns, the public water system minimum residual free chlorine target is 0.4 ppm, and in several systems I became familiar with, the dosing pump was set for 1 ppm. Larger water systems use higher dosing rates to help ensure they meet minimum residuals at distal areas of their network. Small systems, with shorter residence times, can dose at lower concentrations.

--Deuxinfuso

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pasgal
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#6: Post by pasgal »

in my house, there are 4 of us, we use
brita purity c300 quell st, with adjustable head

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homeburrero
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#7: Post by homeburrero »

pasgal wrote:in my house, there are 4 of us, we use
brita purity c300 quell st, with adjustable head
Napoli water ≠ Portland water. The Brita/Mavea Purity Quell filters are decarbonizing filters. These use a WAC resin that would reduce hardness and alkalinity and may acidify the water slightly. That effectively reduces limescale risk, but is not something you need or want with Portland water.
Pat
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pasgal
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#8: Post by pasgal »

homeburrero wrote:That effectively reduces limescale risk, but is not something you need or want with Portland water.
Sorry, I didn't understand this, can you say more about this?

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homeburrero
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#9: Post by homeburrero »

pasgal wrote:Sorry, I didn't understand this, can you say more about this?
Many areas have so much calcium in the water that they will accumulate limescale deposits that can clog or damage the machine if you don't address that by treating the water or periodically descaling. Portland water has so little calcium that this is not an issue.

And some treatment methods that are effective at reducing limescale (like your Quell) accomplish that by reducing both hardness and alkalinity, and lowering the pH a little. You don't need or want any of those with Portland water because the hardness is already low, the alkalinity is right on the low side of ideal, and a lowering of ph could add to corrosion risk.
Pat
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pasgal
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#10: Post by pasgal »

Many, many thanks homeburrero