RPavlis or adjust my softened water?

Water analysis, treatment, and mineral recipes for optimum taste and equipment health.
luvmy40

#1: Post by luvmy40 »

In New Home, Hard Water, Solution? I was asking advice on softening and RO systems. I have installed a whole house softener and now have acceptable hardness levels, PH and contaminant levels. However, using a multi test strip https://www.amazon.com/dp/B092RWYNTY, The API gh/kh test, and the Chem World Chloride test kit, I see the following:

GH from titration test = <18 ppm
KH from titration test = 89.5 ppm
PH from test strip = 7.8-8
PH from cheap PH meter = 8.8
Alkaline from test strip= 0
Chloride from titration test = 82 ppm

My first thought was to install an RO with reminerailization. This is the one I would go with, Home Master TMHP-L Hydroperfection Loaded https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01MUBQIKT/

After looking at all the $ and installation, etc. I decide a more reasonable, cost effective solution would be to simply buy RO or Distilled water and use the RPavlis recipe. This means I can't plumb in to my fill valve, but that is not the end of the world.

I then wondered if I couldn't just add the Potassium Bicarbonate to my softened water to mitigate the effects of the chlorides. I have read that if the PH and Alkalinity are in the right range, then up to 100 ppm chlorides would not have a significant corrosive effect.

Thank you in advance, any input would be appreciated.

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homeburrero
Team HB

#2: Post by homeburrero »

luvmy40 wrote:After looking at all the $ and installation, etc. I decide a more reasonable, cost effective solution would be to simply buy RO or Distilled water and use the RPavlis recipe. This means I can't plumb in to my fill valve, but that is not the end of the world.
Good idea in my opinion. And you can even plumb that in with a carboy and pump rig, like this one: Espresso Cart - Goodbye Plumbed In

luvmy40 wrote:I then wondered if I couldn't just add the Potassium Bicarbonate to my softened water to mitigate the effects of the chlorides. I have read that if the PH and Alkalinity are in the right range, then up to 100 ppm chlorides would not have a significant corrosive effect.
A healthy alkalinity helps mitigate chloride corrosion risk but you already have plenty of that. You might be able to live with that 80 ppm chloride ion but it is above typical recommendations. I would not risk it in a valuable machine with brass or copper boiler, but maybe with your BDB you would sell or replace it long before seeing any consequences. As far as I know there is no clear threshold where chloride ceases to be a corrosion concern even when you have stainless boilers and good alkalinity. La Marzocco USA first noticed problems when servicing machines in Cambridge Mass where chloride was over 100 mg/L, but their advice is now generally to keep the chloride below ~ 30 mg/L. Synesso is even more conservative.

Chloride in Water - Recommended Acceptable Ranges
Boiler-safe level of chlorides (and other compounds) in water
Pat
nínádiishʼnahgo gohwééh náshdlį́į́h

luvmy40 (original poster)

#3: Post by luvmy40 (original poster) »

Thanks Pat!

I actually watched a Pod Cast today with La Marzocco's water guru. Basically, he said you could, technically raise the alkalinity to counter the chlorides, but it would be at the cost of taste.

I think I'll just keep with the RPavlis water for now. $1.06/gal is not that steep when compared to $450.00 initial cost and $120.00/ year maint. for an RO system.