R/O or distilled water? Pressure tank?

Water analysis, treatment, and mineral recipes for optimum taste and equipment health.
Jay21

#1: Post by Jay21 » Aug 10, 2019, 12:41 pm

I got a 2 group commercial machine. It came with this 5 gallon pressure tank.
I need advice, I have a R/O on my failing reef tank I can use.
I can get distilled water.
I can direct plumb into well water with R/O

What the best way to get going?
What is the pressure tank for?

Jay21

#2: Post by Jay21 » Aug 10, 2019, 4:52 pm

any advice is cool, I cant even figure out how the water goes into the bladder tank and the water main of the machine.

the owner said there is an additional line in thje rear for the bladder but still unsure how do you get water into the bladder tank?

Nunas
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#3: Post by Nunas » Aug 11, 2019, 11:42 am

I'll take a run at it :D Does by any chance your "pressure tank" have a small valve that looks like the tire valve on a car? Also, it there only one water inlet? What you may have is an accumulator tank. This is a water chamber with a pressurized internal air bladder. They are installed in the pressured side of a pump to dampen water pressure variations as the pump comes on and off, reduce pump cycling (which will help increase the pump's life).

If the machine was used in a mobile coffee shop, then it might have been connected to a large water reservoir via a pressure pump, such as a Shurflo or Aquatec. While an accumulator tank is not essential, they are commonly fitted in such installations. To plumb them in, a Tee is put in the line anywhere after the pump. The air valve is used to adjust the pressure on the air side of the bladder. Usually, the pressure is set at the same pressure as the pump's pressure switch "turn on" setting.

Another possibility is the machine was used with an RO system. In this case, the RO system cannot produce water fast enough. So, it runs into the accumulator tank as the RO produces water. In this case, when empty of water, the accumulator tank should have a pressure of 5 to 10 psi air. This is enough for it to supply the stored water to a spigot. If a higher pressure is used (like the pump example above), then the RO system will not work efficiently.

So, what do you think...am I close?

Jay21

#4: Post by Jay21 » Aug 11, 2019, 2:22 pm

ys its from a food truck. Im assuming I might bypass this altogether.
Its going to be installed tomorrow and my R/O is still not ordered so I will just bypass for now??
Sound like a plan?

I think I will just bypass this unit for now?
Safe?

The seller texted me this:

Basically, the water coming out of the RO goes into the bladder tank with the 1/8" plastic slide in tube. You split that, and put an 3/8" I think is the input on the coffee machine.

When you RO outputs to the bladder tank, the pressure will fill the coffee machine boiler automatically when you turn it on.

The site tube on the machine should only be 1/2 full, and will auto fill as needed based on the water in the boiler.

You only keep it 1/2 full, because you need expansion for the boiler steam

Nunas
Supporter ♡

#5: Post by Nunas » Aug 11, 2019, 3:43 pm

ys its from a food truck. Im assuming I might bypass this altogether. Its going to be installed tomorrow and my R/O is still not ordered so I will just bypass for now?? Sound like a plan? I think I will just bypass this unit for now? Safe?
Okay! Yes, if you're running off water mains you can eliminate the accumulator. You will, however, need a pressure reducer valve, as espresso machines cannot take the full pressure of the water mains. Check the destruction manual for your machine to see what pressure it needs.
The seller texted me this: Basically, the water coming out of the RO goes into the bladder tank with the 1/8" plastic slide in tube. You split that, and put an 3/8" I think is the input on the coffee machine. When you RO outputs to the bladder tank, the pressure will fill the coffee machine boiler automatically when you turn it on.
Chances are your RO will come with an accumulator tank; most domestic (under-the-sink) units do. I'd use that tank in place of the one you have. However, what's your volume? The tanks that come with typical RO systems are only about one gallon. If you're only doing a few shots at a time, then this is perfect. If you're setting up for production, then you'll need the bigger tank. Actually, if one tank is too small, you can plumb in both of them. Hooking up is simple. Imagine the water line going from the pressure water source (mains or RO unit) straight to the espresso machine. Now, anywhere along that line, cut it and put in a Tee. The accumulator tank goes on the Tee. Yes, the machine should autofill and draw from the accumulator as needed.
The site tube on the machine should only be 1/2 full, and will auto fill as needed based on the water in the boiler. You only keep it 1/2 full, because you need expansion for the boiler steam
Hmmm something odd here. The autofill should fill the service boiler automatically, stopping at the appropriate point for head space (to accumulate steam). As far as I know, there's no sight tube on the service boiler. Does this machine by chance have an inbuilt water reservoir for use when it isn't hooked to the water mains? It's not uncommon for there to be a sight tube on a reservoir. If so, then filling only half way has nothing to do with steam. But, as this is a machine with which I have absolutely no experience, perhaps I'm wrong, or misunderstand what the seller is trying to tell you.

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EvergreenBuzzBuzz

#6: Post by EvergreenBuzzBuzz » Aug 12, 2019, 9:26 am

What machine is it?

There is an entire forum on water. For the health of the machine and taste of the coffee you need to be concerned. When I moved to AZ I put my machine on a tank/pump/accumulator system as the water has high chloride here.
CarefreeBuzzBuzz
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