Long Island NY water report

Water analysis, treatment, and mineral recipes for optimum taste and equipment health.
airmoses83

#1: Post by airmoses83 »

Can anyone recommend a under sink water filter based on my water report?

http://www.wawnc.org/cm/downloads/WAWNC_AWQR_2020.pdf

airmoses83 (original poster)

#2: Post by airmoses83 (original poster) »

I also already have these as whole house filters

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08WRN4Q8J/re ... UTF8&psc=1

Baratza: skilled in the art of grinding
Sponsored by Baratza
User avatar
homeburrero
Team HB

#3: Post by homeburrero »

That water report is problematic in that it gives you numbers for the max, and for the range, but not the average. So you have an alkalinity between 0 - 90.5 mg/L, a calcium ion between 1.5 and 26.1 mg/L (calcium hardness as CaCO3 between 4 and 65 mg/L), and a chloride ion between 2.5 and 86.9 mg/L. At the high end your water would be slightly scale-prone with chloride well above what most machine manufacturers consider acceptable*. But who knows what you actually get at your tap. You might try a friendly call to your water utility to find out. You are looking for average and range numbers that apply to your home address for alkalinity, calcium, and chloride ion.

Your current whole house water treatment system handles chlorine but does not remove chloride, and has a phosphate anti-scale treatment but does not soften. For an undersink system you might benefit by a conventional softening (sodium cation exchange resin) cartridge. It would make the water scale free, and keep that alkalinity level and not acidify the water. It would not reduce the chloride, but if your alkalinity is good that is not as much of a concern. To get rid of chloride you would need to go with an RO and remineralizer system.

* La Marzocco and others recommend that chloride be below 30 mg/L. Synesso is more conservative, recommending it be below 15 mg/L. Any chloride may be corrosive, and if water is acidic or low in alkalinity the corrosion risk is much worse.
Pat
nínádiishʼnahgo gohwééh náshdlį́į́h

airmoses83 (original poster)

#4: Post by airmoses83 (original poster) » replying to homeburrero »

Pat thank you for all that info, very informative. Currently I filter my tap water with BWT + magnesium pitcher to fill my machine. Would this BWT system solve any chloride or scale problems?

https://www.wholelattelove.com/products ... thead-flex

airmoses83 (original poster)

#5: Post by airmoses83 (original poster) »

Or would this work just as good for 1/3rd the price?

https://www.wholelattelove.com/collecti ... system-3-8

User avatar
homeburrero
Team HB

#6: Post by homeburrero »

airmoses83 wrote:Currently I filter my tap water with BWT + magnesium pitcher to fill my machine. Would this BWT system solve any chloride or scale problems?
It has a decarbonizing resin that tends to reduce the calcium as well as the alkalinity, so it should reduce the likelihood of scale. But would do nothing to reduce chloride ion, and since it reduces alkalinity it is not a great choice if you have significant chloride ion in your water.


airmoses83 wrote:Or would this work just as good for 1/3rd the price?
https://www.wholelattelove.com/collecti ... system-3-8
That would be a good choice in my opinion for an undersink filter for your espresso machine. If your water is on the hard side of that reported range it would reduce the hardness to non-scaling levels, would not change the alkalinity, pH, or TDS of the water and would not reduce chloride. You want to keep the alkalinity and pH up to help address the potential for corrosion in case the chloride is as high as your water report implies. At a total hardness of 120 mg/L, the softener cartridge would treat about 125 liters of water before you need to replace the cartridge. If you get a total hardness (GH) drop test kit you can use that to check that the softening filter is not exhausted.

P.S. Did you have any luck contacting your water authority about where in that wide range of numbers your water is? (Especially the chloride ion)
Pat
nínádiishʼnahgo gohwééh náshdlį́į́h

airmoses83 (original poster)

#7: Post by airmoses83 (original poster) »

homeburrero wrote:It has a decarbonizing resin that tends to reduce the calcium as well as the alkalinity, so it should reduce the likelihood of scale. But would do nothing to reduce chloride ion, and since it reduces alkalinity it is not a great choice if you have significant chloride ion in your water.



That would be a good choice in my opinion for an undersink filter for your espresso machine. If your water is on the hard side of that reported range it would reduce the hardness to non-scaling levels, would not change the alkalinity, pH, or TDS of the water and would not reduce chloride. You want to keep the alkalinity and pH up to help address the potential for corrosion in case the chloride is as high as your water report implies. At a total hardness of 120 mg/L, the softener cartridge would treat about 125 liters of water before you need to replace the cartridge. If you get a total hardness (GH) drop test kit you can use that to check that the softening filter is not exhausted.

P.S. Did you have any luck contacting your water authority about where in that wide range of numbers your water is? (Especially the chloride ion)
Havent been able to get anyone. I may just send out a sample for testing.

BPlus: turning your coffee spirit
Sponsored by BPlus
airmoses83 (original poster)

#8: Post by airmoses83 (original poster) »

Ended up going with this setup from whole latte love. Said i wouldnt need to change it for a year