Linea Mini- Increasing TDS and pH

Water analysis, treatment, and mineral recipes for optimum taste and equipment health.
vincenzz67
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#1: Post by vincenzz67 »

Hi, I just got a Linea Mini and plumbed it, and I am looking for ways to increase TDS and pH. I found Primo water at Walmart,

https://primowater.com/wp-content/uploa ... -02-17.pdf

The pH is 6.8 and TDS is 22 according to it's water quality report, which is lower than recommended, how do I increase TDS and pH?
Another note is I couldn't find the alkalinity. Is the water acceptable or should I just use distilled water mixed with TWW?

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homeburrero
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#2: Post by homeburrero »

That 22 ppm out of an RO kiosk would be a rough small fraction of whatever is in the tapwater feeding the machine. Hard to say how much of it might be alkalinity. [Edit correction :oops: - after submitting this I looked at your link, and see that this Primo water has 'minerals added for taste" via an injector. They don't give us a clue about what that 22 ppm is made up of. They claim that it has non-detectable chloride but are not clear what detection limit applies here. It should be fine, but you might look into stores that might sell de-ionized pure water, likely at a Whole Foods store.]

You could use TWW with this. Or instead just use a small amount of bicarbonate (sodium bicarbonate or potassium bicarbonate) to just bring the alkalinity and the pH up. You could use the rpalvis recipe at full or half strength. Using baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) you would add between 0.2 and 0.4 grams per gallon of purified, which would bump your alkalinity up by 30 - 60 ppm as CaCO3.

( See Easiest way to make rpavlis water? )
Pat
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vincenzz67 (original poster)
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#3: Post by vincenzz67 (original poster) »

Thank you, do you mean that I can use Primo water in place of distilled water? I tried to find distilled water but can't find them in 5 gallon buckets, meaning if I can use this water it'd be a lifesaver!

Is there a device or strip that I could check the water's alkalinity?

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homeburrero
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#4: Post by homeburrero »

vincenzz67 wrote:Thank you, do you mean that I can use Primo water in place of distilled water?
Yes you can. Even though you aren't sure what that 22 ppm is, it's low enough to not matter. Often "minerals added" to drinking water contains calcium chloride, but apparently not in this case because it has nondetectable chloride. Just use it in a recipe as you would use distilled or otherwise purified water.
vincenzz67 wrote:Is there a device or strip that I could check the water's alkalinity?
Given the low pH and the low TDS you can assume that it's very low. If you want to test it you can use a low range alkalinity drop titration kit. You could use the popular API fishcare KH kit with a stretched sample*.


*The API KH kit normally uses a 5 ml water sample, and each drop of titrant corresponds to 17.9 mg/L as CaCO3 alkalinity. If you instead use a 10 ml sample, then each drop corresponds to 8.9 mg/L. You can even try a 20 ml sample where each drop corresponds to 4.5 mg/l, but that may be stretching too far.
Pat
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edh
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#5: Post by edh »

homeburrero wrote:Given the low pH and the low TDS you can assume that it's very low. If you want to test it you can use a low range alkalinity drop titration kit. You could use the popular API fishcare KH kit with a stretched sample*.

*The API KH kit normally uses a 5 ml water sample, and each drop of titrant corresponds to 17.9 mg/L as CaCO3 alkalinity. If you instead use a 10 ml sample, then each drop corresponds to 8.9 mg/L. You can even try a 20 ml sample where each drop corresponds to 4.5 mg/l, but that may be stretching too far.
I've stretched the API Ca, GH, and KH kits to 50 ml and 100 ml. This allows one to read levels 10X-20X lower than the kit design accurately or greatly increase the accuracy of higher values. I've matched the published Calcium number of 6.2-6.4 mg/l given for Crystal Geyser Shasta sourced water within .5 mg/l using this technique.

The color change is not sharp as it is with a 5 ml or 10 ml sample, but the results are fine. The color change will take place over several drops and will be a fade from one color to the next. The KH for example, changes from blue to a blue-green to green to a yellow-green to yellow with a hint of green(final color).

The secret to doing these long stretches is to add each drop slowly once you notice the first hint of a color change. Note that drop number, add the next drop, mix well, let stand 10 seconds, add the next drop, mix well and wait 10 seconds. Repeat until the next drop results in no perceived color change. Note the previous drop number. This will be your value. Add two or three more drops as above past what you think is your value to confirm no further color change. Run it again once you know what you're looking for. You can rapidly add the drops to just before the first color change as determined on the first run.

It's a bit fiddly, but with care and practice, you can coax surprisingly accurate and precise numbers out of these humble kits.

Ed
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