Does 3M filter make sense for this water?

Water analysis, treatment, and mineral recipes for optimum taste and equipment health.
charlesaf3
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#1: Post by charlesaf3 »

Thanks for all comments. I'd appreciate if the multitude of you more knowledgable than I would weigh in with whether this would be a good filter system.

I have a LM Linea mini, plumbed in.

My city water is, from a professional lab:

Ca2+ 22 mg/L
Mg2+ 3.79
Water Hardness 70.5 mg/L

Also

Fe .0103 mg/L
Pb .765 ug/L

I propose to put the 3M Cuno Filter ESP 124T as others have done. (Filter PS 124)

I also have chloramines in the water, of unknown potency. I was considering adding in front of the 124 an 3m HF60-CL, which filters Chlorine and Cloramines. This would be primarily to protect the machine, with minor taste improvements I suppose.

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CarefreeBuzzBuzz
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#2: Post by CarefreeBuzzBuzz »

You also need to know about chlorides which isn't going to get filtered like Chlorine and Cloramines, unless you do RO. So what does the report say about that. Pat will be able to respond to your main question.
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homeburrero
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#3: Post by homeburrero »

Yes, you do need to know the alkalinity in order to make scaling decisions, and need to know the chloride in case you have chloride corrosion issues.

If you're on Richmond VA water (http://www.richmondgov.com/PublicUtilit ... ty2018.pdf ) it looks like you have alkalinity around 47 mg/L (CaCO3 equivalent) and chloride ion about 14 mg/L. Lower chloride would be better but it's not high enough to make most people resort to RO. Alkalinity is near ideal, so you don't want to use a decarbonizing filter (BWT bestmax, Quell ST, Everpure claris, etc).

Given all that, the 3M Cuno 124 (activated charcoal block + conventional strong acid sodium exhange softener) is a reasonable choice. It would keep your alkalinity and reduce your hardness down to where you should never see limescale accumulation.

An inexpensive alternative would be to just use a particulates and carbon block filter. With no softening and your 22 mg/L calcium ion (calcium hardness as CaCO3 of 55 mg/L) and alkalinity of 50 mg/L, you might expect slight scale in a very hot steam boiler, in the ballpark of 10 mg per liter of throughput, which could be handled with an infrequent descaling. At lower steam boiler temps you may never see much scale. (See Jim Schulman's Insanely Long Water FAQ for details. )

PS
(Edit addition)
I see there are two sizes:
MODEL ESP114-T removes hardness up to 700 grains.
MODEL ESP124-T removes hardness up to 1,100 grains

And at your low hardness you might not be exhausting the softener when you replace the filter at the max interval of 12 months, so I think you might get by with the smaller one. Your 71 mg/L total hardness is about 4.2 gpg, so 700 grains of softener would be used up in about 165 gallons.
Pat
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charlesaf3
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#4: Post by charlesaf3 »

Thank you very much.

It is Richmond VA city water. Ihave been using the simple carbon solution, but have been worrying I've been exposing the boiler to too much scale, hence the switch to Cuno.

Is there a downside to throwing the HF60-CL on in front of it? Aside from extra cost? It says it filters Chlorine taste and Odor, along with Chloramines. Not sure if that is effectively filtering Chlorides

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homeburrero
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#5: Post by homeburrero »

charlesaf3 wrote:Is there a downside to throwing the HF60-CL on in front of it? Aside from extra cost?
Cost is the only downside I see. It handles 4700 gallons! And you still need to replace it every year. It would have no effect on the chloride ion.
Pat
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homeburrero
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#6: Post by homeburrero »

I see from the original post that you are probably thinking that the PS124 won't handle the chloramine. It does have an activated charcoal block, and that should handle chlorine, taste, and odor, but 3M doesn't say anything there about chloramine. I think it may be fine though. Chloramine is filtered by activated charcoal block, but is a little harder to filter than chlorine and takes more contact time. You can buy 'catalytic carbon' filters that are marketed as better suited for chloramine, or take a very economical approach of adding a big 10" carbon block to your system if you are worried about some chloramines getting through and affecting the taste of your coffee.

P.S.
3M does have cartridge softening filters that they specifically identify as filtering chloramine in their marketing literature - the ScaleGard Pro series. But these are WAC resin filters (decarbonizing filters) and would not be a good choice in your situation where you want to keep all the alkalinity that's in your water. I'm not even sure that the activated carbon in these is that much better than the ESP124-T for chloramine reduction on a home espresso machine.
Pat
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charlesaf3
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#7: Post by charlesaf3 »

thank you again for your knowledge and assistance.

I figured I'm probably far enough away from the water plant that the free chlorine would have mostly gone away, with only the chloramines left. I don't notice much chlorine when I drink the water or shower in it. Rather unscientific I know...

The HF60-CL would be basically to protect the boiler. I do have a carbon block filter I could put in front, but I also hate wrenching that thing off under the cabinet - I admit one of the attractions of the 3m filter is the twist-bayonet.

But if you don't think the HF60-CL is going to save me a $100 of damage to the machine a year, it's obviously not worth it.