BWT water filter replacement indications

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jmbinette

#1: Post by jmbinette »

Hi to all,

Other than volume, are they any indicators that a BWT cartridge needs to be replaced ?
Will lose flow or maybe other indications ?

Thanks,

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homeburrero
Team HB

#2: Post by homeburrero »

There are different types of BWT cartridges, so you'll get better advice if you tell us which one you have.

On the cartidges that provide some softening they have a fixed softening capacity table that is spelled out in the operator manual - for a given hardness or carbonate level (GH or KH, depends on which type of softener). At a given bypass setting and a given GH or KH it tells you how many liters it will treat before the ion exchange resin would be depleted. If you have no idea of the volume that has gone through, then your next best indication of an exhausted filter would be to test the GH and KH with a drop titration kit. If it's the same as your incoming tapwater that would indicate depletion of softening resin if you are using a cartridge that has a softening resin. (The BWT bestprotect is designed to greatly reduce GH but not KH. Others, like the BWT Bestmax use a WAC resin and they are designed to reduce both GH and KH.)
Pat
nínádiishʼnahgo gohwééh náshdlį́į́h

JRising

#3: Post by JRising »

If you're talking about the actual BWT AquaMeter that flashes when the pre-set volume is consumed, yes, they also have a physical time setting and flash when the year is almost up.


Two birds with one stone. Even if they haven't been fully consumed by the volume of water through the softener, the anti-microbial properties of the cartridge are only designed to last a year.

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homeburrero
Team HB

#4: Post by homeburrero »

Thanks for that info John. I didn't think about the OP having a flowmeter, and it's good that the BWT aquameter can alarm when near the programmed months in service limit as well as when near the liters throughput limit - not something they tell us in the product literature.
Pat
nínádiishʼnahgo gohwééh náshdlį́į́h

JRising

#5: Post by JRising »

Back to the OP's O question. If the cartridge is blocking flow, that is very likely the particle filtration portion of it getting physically blocked with undisolved solids, we see this in commercial applications where a machine is installed immediately after a shop completes their plumbing... Crap in the pipes makes its way to a brand new filter and within a couple weeks the machine is reporting flow errors and failures to fill boiler.

And in comparison to little in the reservoir filter/softeners, if they completely dry out from dis-use for a few weeks, trying to get them re-primed is like trying to pass water through sandstone. They will soften in time, but your pump is going to complain.
I don't know about BWT's choice of resin. They're not supposed to be able to ever go completely dry and then be re-used, but it does say to flush them again with 3-5 gallons if they ever sit idle for a month.

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BaristaBoy E61

#6: Post by BaristaBoy E61 »

JRising wrote: Even if they haven't been fully consumed by the volume of water through the softener, the anti-microbial properties of the cartridge are only designed to last a year.
OK, I get this. But why should I care unless the filter is used for cold or room temperature drinks?

As it's being used exclusively for espresso with a machine that's programmed to turn on at least 1-hour before use with a brew boiler that's about 205˚F and a steam boiler that's about 254˚F, what bacteria or pathogens can grow in that?

Is it only to protect the manufacturer?

Seriously...
"You didn't buy an Espresso Machine - You bought a Chemistry Set!"

JRising

#7: Post by JRising »

Is it only to sell more filters?

I don't know for certain. I do know that after many restaurants were shut down for 3 to 6 months in 2020 during the pandemic their filters became blocked long before their capacity was up. They worked for a while after being re-flushed and brought back into service but solidified before their year was done. (We're talking commercial 3M filters, not BWTs, but softeners are structurally similar.

I encourage you to get several more months out of the filter and see how it goes. Test the water every couple of months and see if it's still softening well, and listen for pump noise on the boiler-refills to be sure the filter isn't restricting flow.

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BaristaBoy E61

#8: Post by BaristaBoy E61 »

Thanks John, honest and solid advice as always.

Especially in a commercial setting, it would be unconscionable to not replace filter cartridges that have been inactive and unused, as there is an unknown risk to the public.

I also concede that it might not be wise to draw water from the filter head bypass valve for cold water applications.


TNX
"You didn't buy an Espresso Machine - You bought a Chemistry Set!"