Brita filtered water safe for espresso machine?

Water analysis, treatment, and mineral recipes for optimum taste and equipment health.
fizguy

#1: Post by fizguy »

I just got a profitec pro 700 (beautiful machine!) and am committed to minimizing scale buildup through judicious choices of water.

I measured the hardness of the water filtered through my Brita filter and was surprised that it is rather low.

Image


Is this safe for long term use, given my goals above?

Justin

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redbone

#2: Post by redbone »

Brita filters are (GAC) granular activated carbon. More info on this type of filter can be found here by The Minnesota Department of Health.https://www.health.state.mn.us/communit ... s/gac.html.

By safe for espresso machine I take it you mean machine safety such as will it incur damage to the boiler etc. Granular activated carbon filters do a good job in reducing chlorine and some contaminants but are not very effective in reducing hardness levels of water. To answer your question best it depends on the water coming in. If the water has relatively low hardness levels and is disinfected by chlorine then a Brita would suffice but if there are other issues including high hardness levels then the Brita filter is not sufficient.
Between order and chaos there is espresso.
Semper discens.


Rob
LMWDP #549

John49

#3: Post by John49 »

fizguy wrote:I just got a profitec pro 700 (beautiful machine!) and am committed to minimizing scale buildup through judicious choices of water.

I measured the hardness of the water filtered through my Brita filter and was surprised that it is rather low.

image


Is this safe for long term use, given my goals above?

Justin
The Brita filters, in addition to carbon, also have an ion exchange resin to reduce water hardness.

RobindG

#4: Post by RobindG »

Check pH !

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homeburrero
Team HB

#5: Post by homeburrero »

Modern Brita jug filters do have a small amount of WAC resin that reduces hardness and alkalinity and lowers pH especially when fresh.

Before deciding it's best to know your tap water general hardness, alkalinity, and chloride numbers. Your water authority hopefully can provide those numbers. If you do it yourself, drop titration kits can give you more precision than that strip.
Pat
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homeburrero
Team HB

#6: Post by homeburrero »

PS

GAC granulated activated carbon. Adsorbs chlorine tastes and odors.

WAC. Weak acid cation. Ion exchange resin exchanges calcium and magnesium with protons (hydrogen ion) which are buffered by bicarbonate, reducing alkalinity.

Brita jug filters are mostly GAC with some WAC beads.
Pat
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fizguy

#7: Post by fizguy »

Thanks for the replies.

I did test the water straight from the tap and found it to be between 120 to 250.

I am curious as to why that matters, rather than only the reading after being filtered.

Regards,

Justin

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homeburrero
Team HB

#8: Post by homeburrero »

That filter is variable wrt softening. At the end of its recommended life you may get no softening.

Also you can't do limescale guestimates until you know both the calcium hardness and the alkalinity. Total hardness can be used as a conservative overestimate of calcium hardness.
Pat
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fizguy

#9: Post by fizguy »

Got it, thank you.