Aquacode for Espresso

Water analysis, treatment, and mineral recipes for optimum taste and equipment health.
NYFilter93

#1: Post by NYFilter93 »

Hello,

I have been using Aquacode brewing water at 100-120 ppm for a while now with pourover brewing. I prefer the clarity, acidity and sweetness I get with it over TWW. I recently got an espresso machine for my place and want to make sure it's okay to use.

The measurements at 118 ppm are:

Calcium: 6.3 ppm
Magnesium: 16.9 ppm
Sodium: .6 ppm
Potassium: .6 ppm
Hardness: 85 ppm

Also if anyone has used Aquacode for espresso I would love to hear your feedback.

User avatar
homeburrero
Team HB

#2: Post by homeburrero »

That analysis only tells you the major cations (positively charged ions.) What you really need to know before subjecting your Slayer to this water is related to anions. If you can get numbers for alkalinity, or for bicarbonate ion, that would be important. And the main thing you need to know is the amount of chloride ion in the water as it is a major cause of corrosion risk in espresso machines.
Pat
nínádiishʼnahgo gohwééh náshdlį́į́h

NYFilter93 (original poster)

#3: Post by NYFilter93 (original poster) »

I see. Is there any affordable way to measure that? I can't seem to find the info online?

User avatar
homeburrero
Team HB

#4: Post by homeburrero »

See if the folks at aquacode can give you numbers for alkalinity (or for carbonate and bicarbonate ion) and for chloride ion content in mg/L (or ppm). I assume that's how you got your other numbers?

A simple inexpensive drop titration kit for alkalinity would give you your alkalinity number. Any drop kit that measures KH, carbonate hardness, or temporary hardness will measure that. The API fishcare kits are cheap and do a reasonable job, especially if you 'stretch' them with a 10 ml sample.

You can get drop titration kits from Hach that will measure chloride ion: The skinny on chloride testing? But hopefully the folks at Aquacode can fill you in and save you that expense. Normal sea water is loaded with chloride along with sodium. Aquacode's treatment clearly takes out the sodium, and perhaps it similarly removes the chloride.

Slayer wants your incoming water to have less than 30 mg/L chloride ion: Chloride in Water - Recommended Acceptable Ranges
Pat
nínádiishʼnahgo gohwééh náshdlį́į́h