Adding potassium bicarbonate to distilled water

Water analysis, treatment, and mineral recipes for optimum taste and equipment health.
thusband

#1: Post by thusband »

OK so it's 100mg of potassium bicarbonate per liter of distilled water right? That's only 0.1g. Even if I have 5.5 liters of distilled water it's still only half a gram. I don't have a scale that will measure that. Do I need to buy a better scale or is there another way?

Many thanks

AMac

#2: Post by AMac »

I think this thread will answer your question. Basically, use a larger mass of potassium bicarbonate to make a concentrate then use that to amend your distilled water.

Concentrate for RPavilis water recipe

thusband

#3: Post by thusband »

There we go. It's clear now. Thanks a lot.

Quick question. How long will the concentrated solution keep fresh?

pcrussell50

#4: Post by pcrussell50 » replying to thusband »

I've never made the concentrate but...

I usually keep a gallon made at any given time... In our vacation home... So it is prone to sitting for up to three or four months at a time. Never a problem. No slime or cloudiness. It's been a while since I read Dr. Pavlis's bit on it, but IIRC he mentioned that it suppresses microbial growth. Or at least the common microbes that infest water.

One other thing... The amount of potassium bicarb you add is non-critical. IIRC, Dr. Pavlis said you can add only 50mg/l as well or 100mg/l. IOW, it's not a critical measurement.

-Peter
LMWDP #553

thusband

#5: Post by thusband »

Great, not so difficult after all. Thanks again.

tom

#6: Post by tom »

I just went down the rabbit hole in the last few days reading up on the rpavlis recipe. I briefly summarized what I learned here, with the option of using sodium bicarbonate (regular baking soda) instead of potassium bicarbonate. In the notes, I tried linking to original comments by Prof. Pavlis regarding variations on his recipe. I'm new here, but it seemed to me that these comments were often referred to in discussions, but not always linked to, so it took a little bit of effort to track them down. Sounds like you are all set based on earlier replies, but I just point it out in case you find it helpful.

thusband

#7: Post by thusband »

Interesting. I'm sort of locked into potassium bicarbonate for now but it's good to know there are alternatives. Very informative.

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sweaner
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#8: Post by sweaner »

I just bought a 0.01 gram scale. Not expensive.
Scott
LMWDP #248

pcrussell50

#9: Post by pcrussell50 »

thusband wrote:Interesting. I'm sort of locked into potassium bicarbonate for now but it's good to know there are alternatives. Very informative.
Yep, baking soda is fine too. Dr. Pavlis said since it has a smaller molecular weight than K, you would use a little more of it.

-Peter
LMWDP #553

tom

#10: Post by tom »

pcrussell50 wrote:Dr. Pavlis said since it has a smaller molecular weight than K, you would use a little more of it.
I believe it is the other way around; you use slightly more potassium bicarbonate compared to sodium bicarbonate since the molar mass of the former is higher (equivalently, there are less particles per gram). To be quantitative, homeburrero notes 2.0g of KHCO3 is effectively equivalent to 1.68g of NaHC03.