What's the deal with freezing coffee beans?

Beginner and pro baristas share tips and tricks.
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DJL

#1: Post by DJL »

I have a bunch of roasts arriving from online purchases. Is storing sealed coffee bags in freezer a good storage option?

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HB
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#2: Post by HB »

Coffee: To Freeze or Not to Freeze details a comparison of frozen vs. fresh coffee. They stored coffee in sealed glass Mason jars in a chest freezer. Typical home freezers aren't as cold, but as John noted, you'll find many threads reporting good results. Coffee bags used for shipping may or may not be airtight. If I expect to use a coffee in less than two weeks, I am sometimes lazy and just seal the coffee bag inside a freezer bag. Otherwise, I open the bag, split the coffee into separate smaller Mason jars (enough for 2-4 days) and freeze it.
Dan Kehn

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DJL

#3: Post by DJL » replying to HB »

Thanks, I'll give this a try.

Eiern

#4: Post by Eiern »

I get a bunch of subscription coffee at almost the same time. I split 250g bags in two 125g vacuum sealed plastic bags after resting in the original bag for 10 days, and store in the freezer. Works a charm. It doesn't take too long for it to reach room temp (coffee isn't mostly water etc. so isn't technically freezed, it's just stored very cold, which helps, so it isn't really thawed either, just warmed back up to room temp).

Nunas
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#5: Post by Nunas »

I never freeze any more, as I've been roasting my own coffee for years. When I did freeze, I packaged my coffee into small airtight containers, the smaller the better. The idea is to thaw out and warm to room temperature before opening. Once open, you need to use the coffee within a few days. Later on we bought a vacuum sealer, as another poster mentioned. These things are an essential piece of kitchen gear and work great for storing small quantities of coffee in the freezer.

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DJL

#6: Post by DJL »

Eiern wrote:I get a bunch of subscription coffee at almost the same time. I split 250g bags in two 125g vacuum sealed plastic bags after resting in the original bag for 10 days, and store in the freezer. Works a charm. It doesn't take too long for it to reach room temp (coffee isn't mostly water etc. so isn't technically freezed, it's just stored very cold, which helps, so it isn't really thawed either, just warmed back up to room temp).
Awesome. So sounds like I'm safe to store in freezer. I go through a pound in a week. Have 7lbs (7x 1lbs bags) on the way (ordered a larger quantity to save a few bucks). Thanks for the info.

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DJL

#7: Post by DJL »

JohnB. wrote:And as I said all that has been covered over & over. Why do the same questions have to be answered every 60-90 days with a new thread? Because people are too lazy to use the search function.
Hi JohnB, thanks for your 2nd contribution to my OP. I got my answer above. Cheers!

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CoffeeMac

#8: Post by CoffeeMac »

I buy Redbird by the 5 pound bag; when it arrives I divide and vacuum seal into 0.5 lb bags and store in freezer. I keep a mason jar, which just holds 0.5 lbs of beans, in freezer as well that I pull from each day. I grind the frozen beans directly. Have been doing this for years and works great!

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HB
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#9: Post by HB »

Dan Kehn

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HB
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#10: Post by HB »

Following up...
DJL wrote:Is storing sealed coffee bags in freezer a good storage option?
The convention wisdom is that you break open the bags into Mason jars and freeze. I noted "If I expect to use a coffee in less than two weeks, I am sometimes lazy and just seal the coffee bag inside a freezer bag." Has this practice been denounced as heresy? What about taping over the one-way valve and throwing the bag into the freezer? I've done that too, but not recently because more and more roasters have switched to semi-permeable bags.
Dan Kehn