Tim Wendelboe's tips on making espresso [video]

Beginner and pro baristas share tips and tricks.
mathof

#1: Post by mathof »

This morning I was alerted on email by the online Global Coffee Festival that Tim Wendelboe was about to do a live broadcast on Instagram about making espresso. I watched it over breakfast. It's aimed at the beginner, but nonetheless I found it interesting, particularly as most of his views (e.g., use a refractometer to dial in beans) reflect my own practice. If you want to take a look, here's a link:

https://www.instagram.com/p/CHAWdEenfvW/
★ Helpful

Jeff
Team HB

#2: Post by Jeff »

I wish I had heard this 10 or 15 years ago. Many bad shots and months of frustration and self-doubt would have been avoided.

I think valuable for anyone willing to listen (an hour long, so I've been splitting it up) and figure out which of the concepts can fit their budget and style.

(Suitable refractometers and either filters or a centrifuge are as expensive as mid-level grinders.)

okmed

#3: Post by okmed »

Very informative, thanks for the link.

MNate
Supporter ♡

#4: Post by MNate »

Great, now I have to buy a refractometer. Sounds fun, though.

Yeah, this was a good intro to espresso though. I think I learned some things, even after several years of being pretty happy with my espresso.

K7

#5: Post by K7 »

Thanks, I enjoyed the video.

In the video, he says colder brewing water gives you a faster flow rate compared to hotter water. I've seen the same comment somewhere deep in this forum but couldn't figure out the reasoning behind it. Seems a bit counterintuitive to me because hotter water extracts more and should cause faster puck erosion. Does anyone know why that is the case? And to what degree?

Thanks,

wai2cool4u
Supporter

#6: Post by wai2cool4u »

Thanks for sharing.

Jeff
Team HB

#7: Post by Jeff »

K7 wrote:In the video, he says colder brewing water gives you a faster flow rate compared to hotter water. I've seen the same comment somewhere deep in this forum but couldn't figure out the reasoning behind it. Seems a bit counterintuitive to me because hotter water extracts more and should cause faster puck erosion. Does anyone know why that is the case? And to what degree?
The relationship between flow rates at a given pressure vs. temperature is one I've had some conversations about. I don't know if there's a "conclusive" answer. Over the break, or when I'm willing to sink a kg's worth of shots, I've got a controlled test on my long list of DE1 experiments to explore. Being able to see extracted weight over time could also be done with another, sufficiently stable machine and a connected scale. Pulling 10, "identically dosed" shots at five temperatures and then making sense of the data isn't one of those, "Oh, let me just try..." things.

K7

#8: Post by K7 » replying to Jeff »

Looking forward to whatever you find! :)

The only thing I can think of is that maybe hotter water causes the coffee to expand more (a la hot vs cold balloon) making the puck more resistive.

MNate
Supporter ♡

#9: Post by MNate »

He mentioned people often roast darker to get rid of the acidity, whereas doing other things to increase extraction will reduce acidity (without losing the flavor of the bean). Well, I thought I'd switch to the blooming espresso profile on my DE1 to see what more extraction might taste like, haven't tried that much, didn't tell my wife what I did but she asked, "Did you use a darker roast?" Hmm... she didn't necessarily think sweeter though. I do think we like this shot better. More to play with again.

(I had been using the Londinium profile and didn't even change the grind when I tried the blooming profile. I thought the specs looked pretty good though- a few drops through the pause and 21 second pour time- but I'm sure I could grind finer as well.)

Arafel

#10: Post by Arafel »

That was a great video. The refractometer looks cool, but it's SUPER exensive. $750 or so, plus you then buy the software. Search on Amazon doesn't really reveal any substitutes.