Stone in grinder

Beginner and pro baristas share tips and tricks for making espresso.
jefegold
Posts: 34
Joined: 4 years ago

#1: Post by jefegold »

Hi all,
I was "having a lovely time" making espressos with coffee from Industry Beans' Fitzroy St blend, sweet milk hazelnut and caramel. I switched for a bit to another coffee with more berry flavors, and in making my second or third coffee from it a stone could clearly be heard in my grinder. I got it out, checked the burrs--which looked okay--and had to re-dial in. However, both coffees now taste quite harsh. I'll continue to play around, but have any of you had this experience?

Thanks
Jeff

guyy
Posts: 32
Joined: 3 years ago

#2: Post by guyy »

Yup. It happens. There was a rock in my bag one morning and i was too bleary eyed to notice when i weighed out my first espresso. Into the grinder it went - arghh! No coffee.

Milligan
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#3: Post by Milligan »

Most roasters sort, double check, or have destoners. I've seen quite a few rocks and other debris in greens. They usually stand out like a sore thumb after roasting since they... don't roast. Unfortunately, it goes with the territory with a natural product that one will eventually slip through. You'll probably want to inspect your burrs closely for damage especially if you taste a significant difference.

Jonk
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#4: Post by Jonk »

Yup, go through dozens of kilos and eventually there will be a rock hiding among the beans, even if both producers and roasters tried their best to avoid it.

Perhaps there was damage to something other than the burrs? Could be a good idea to check alignment.

ShotClock
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#5: Post by ShotClock »

I've found a couple of small chunks of concrete in my greens, but never in roasted coffee, and nothing made it close to a grinder.

I believe that there are a couple of risk factors though: Patio dried coffees (like many Ethiopian Naturals) are at risk of picking up small chunks of concrete during the drying process. Also, very small roasting operations may not be using a destoner, and might therefore be more of a risk. For me, this last point is more of a reason for increased caution rather than a reason to buy or not from a given roaster...

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yakster
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#6: Post by yakster »

Single dosing your coffee makes it easier to visually check for foreign debris before grinding.
-Chris

LMWDP # 272

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BaristaBoy E61
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#7: Post by BaristaBoy E61 replying to yakster »

+1
Single dosing & asking if roaster is using a destoner. XD
"You didn't buy an Espresso Machine - You bought a Chemistry Set!"

guyy
Posts: 32
Joined: 3 years ago

#8: Post by guyy »

Once in a while a rock will elude a destoner. Given enough coffee, it will happen. I suspect it's even easier to get by my feeble eyes. I guess you could also stay away from natural processed Ethopians ( that's what my rock was in).

jkoll42
Posts: 105
Joined: 14 years ago

#9: Post by jkoll42 »

I only ever had one stone in my 20+ years of homeroasting and it made it to the grinder. Thankfully I was making japanese iced so it went into the Bunn LPG and apparently it was a fairly soft stone and there was no issue.

Milligan
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#10: Post by Milligan »

It really is just one of those things that comes along with grinding whole beans. Like a rock hitting your windshield. Happens every so often, part of life. There are ways to minimize it especially as mentioned with single dosing and checking yourself. Most people don't deal with it because they buy preground.