"Slow grinding" - Lance is back with another interesting hack - Page 2

Beginner and pro baristas share tips and tricks for making espresso.
bznelson91
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#11: Post by bznelson91 »

I've noticed a likely related phenomenon with my DF64 Gen 2. If I just dump the beans in, the grind setting dial drifts towards the coarse maybe a quarter or third of a unit over the duration of the grind, settling back into place towards the end. If I slow feed, that effect is less pronounced if not eliminated. What I'd been trying to do was hold the ring while dosing (which made it tricky, because I also have to hold my PF in place as there have been some disasters with it falling out), but now I'm thinking I'm going to try slow feeding more often. Perhaps I need a device of some kind to slow feed automatically. I feel like the Niche Zero is in a good place with their little anti-popcorn thing, but obviously, that exact "fix" won't work with other grinders.

Brad

nick_111
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#12: Post by nick_111 »

erik82 wrote:There are a lot of posts about slow feeding the last years so you probably missed them. In almost every SD grinder topic people are talking about it. There's also been whole topics about it to but they are I think about 3 years old already. It's pretty widespread information.

There's also a lot of people not doing RDT and WDT so that's also the reason why people don't slow feed. Not everyone wants to do all kind of tricks. And if you have a lesser grinder and unimodal burrs you can be limited by the grinders so than it's not possible. Lots of reasons to think of.
I would be curious to try this on my Atom 75.

Would slow feeding help reduce retention in this case ?

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Jeff
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#13: Post by Jeff »

Running even the same burrs at 200 RPM compared to 1400/1700 RPM is also a consideration.

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Jeff
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#14: Post by Jeff »

nick_111 wrote:I would be curious to try this on my Atom 75. Would slow feeding help reduce retention in this case ?
For a grinder with a short exit path, it might reduce retention. Traditional grinders with long exit paths are less likely to have benefit. See the photos in Post #3 here for a visual.

Capuchin Monk
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#15: Post by Capuchin Monk »


h3yn0w
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#16: Post by h3yn0w »

sympa wrote:I take your word for it, however, I've been reading up on/making espresso for ~3 years now and this is the first time I've seen it mentioned. At the very least, it does not seem to be a widespread practice. I guess my follow-up question is: if it has such effects, why isn't everyone doing it? Especially curious since we espresso fanatics are willing to do all sorts of inconvenient things in the name of chasing god shots.
The idea has been out there a while. eg James Hoffman has a video on it from a couple years ago. Some new grinders such as the Zerno come with adjustable augers to adjust the feed rate of the beans to your preference.

Javier
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#17: Post by Javier »

erik82 wrote:This isn't something new and that some of us have been doing for years.
Amen to that!
LMWDP #115

cpreston
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#18: Post by cpreston »

I wonder if this feed isssue might be part of the explanation why large burrs are generally said to taste better. I've never understood a really credible explanation for this before, outside of heat buildup in high volume grinding.
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sympa (original poster)
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#19: Post by sympa (original poster) »

Is the idea something like: larger burr = more efficiently moves particles through the set into the chute = more grind uniformity?

cpreston
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#20: Post by cpreston »

I was following someone else's observation that large burrs could handle more beans without packing them together as much, and therefore wouldn't be as sensitive to the bean load variations.