Sink that First Shot - Page 2

Beginner and pro baristas share tips and tricks.
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cafeIKE (original poster)
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#11: Post by cafeIKE (original poster) »

Keep the puck in the machine overnight?
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hbuchtel

#12: Post by hbuchtel »

I've been drinking french press for the last couple months (equipment and time constraints :( ), but the same idea might work with a press as well :?:

French presses also get serious oil build up, and while I don't like having to dismantle the sieve to clean it, after a week or so it becomes noticeable in the coffee.

Regards, Henry
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cannonfodder
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#13: Post by cannonfodder »

After I decant my press pot, I will put a couple drops of dish detergent in the press, fill it about 3/4 with water, put the press in and 'froth' the detergent up. Pretty much cleans it all up.
Dave Stephens

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Whale

#14: Post by Whale » replying to cannonfodder »

I do that has well but not every time, I usually only rinse in hot water and soap "froth" once a week. I find that because the dish detergent will leave a taste to it that I can taste on the first "push" after the soap has gone in. I never could completely rinse that taste out. Same thing with the tea pot!
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RapidCoffee
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#15: Post by RapidCoffee »

Stuggi wrote:I think what you're doing here is dissolving old oils with new oils, thus removing any rancid coffee oils from the machine.
Unfortunately this has the ring of truth. But the implications are ugly. As in, how long does the machine have to sit before the coated coffee oils get nasty? Sigh. Looks like I may need to rethink my cleaning regimen. :shock: Thanks, Ian.
Whale wrote:I find that because the dish detergent will leave a taste to it that I can taste on the first "push" after the soap has gone in. I never could completely rinse that taste out.
I have heard others complain about residual soap taste, but I have to wonder if this is truly a factor. Detergents are formulated to dissolve easily in water. Let's say a thorough rinse removes 99% of the detergent in your coffee or tea pot. After three rinses, you are down to one part in a million. After six rinses (which we used for biochem lab glassware, back in my former life), it's one part in a trillion.

It's possible that dish detergent adheres to certain materials, and is only released in the presence of coffee or tea. But that seems unlikely for glass and most metals (dunno about organics like plastics).

One suggestion: dilute the dish detergent before squeezing it on your glassware. You don't need much. As Dave said, a couple of drops is sufficient for a thorough cleaning.
John

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Whale

#16: Post by Whale »

I really can taste the soap right after the wash. I do try to rinse a lot, wipe and rinse again but still. Also, I find that the offending soapy taste is a lot stronger/discernable in tea.

When I was a youngster, my mother would tell me never to put soap in her tea pot. That it made the tea taste bad. Well, as you may know by now, I question everything and I tried it. And she was right!

I still do it in the french press because of the oily film that I am afraid will leave more of a bad taste than the soap. At least I can only taste the soap once after washing. I think that the soap residue may get stuck to the press filter. These don't rinse easily.

I usually only wash the tea pot, and cups for that matter, with hot water and give it a strong rub. I hate the taste of dish soap. And I have tried many brands.
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shadowfax

#17: Post by shadowfax »

Have you tried Urnex Cafiza? I've always used a touch of espresso machine cleaner (Joe Glo right now, though I don't like it as much as Cafiza) on my vac pot and French press. It just takes a bit, and a few hot rinses (with tea tap water) to get it very clean. I haven't used a French press in ages, but I sure don't pick it up on the vac pot. Granted, on the vac pot I don't use the Cafiza on the filter (I use cloth).
Nicholas Lundgaard

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cafeIKE (original poster)
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#18: Post by cafeIKE (original poster) »

Since everyone else has gone OT :roll:

"Our teapots break before they are washed." admonished my Nan, more than a half century ago.
hbuchtel wrote:after a week or so it becomes noticeable in the coffee.
No sh*t, Sherlock! :wink: Eons ago, day 3 was determined as the FP teardown maintenance limit.

To clean FP: disassemble, wash with dishes. [FP is washed first, before anything else] Mechanically scrub all parts with brush in HOT, CLEAN soapy water. Mechanically scrub all parts under clear HOT water stream. Air dry.

DavidMLewis

#19: Post by DavidMLewis »

Whale wrote:I find that because the dish detergent will leave a taste to it that I can taste on the first "push" after the soap has gone in. I never could completely rinse that taste out. Same thing with the tea pot!
That's exactly what Urnex's Clearly Coffee was designed to do, and it does it very well. Machine cleaners will do a better job if there's an existing build-up, but Clearly Coffee rinses completely and it's easy to use a few grains after each use of the press. And it's cheap if you buy a box of packets from the Urnex web site.

Best,
David

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Whale

#20: Post by Whale »

I use Urnex Cafiza with the espresso machine. Must admit that have never tried with the French press. At home I only use the press only very occasionally mostly with guess ( I still have not converting all my friends).

Most french press usage is done amy mom country place (she is resisting all my attempt at conversion to the espresso side) and Tea is at the office (no espresso there). Urnex Cafiza is not answering the call at either place (yet?).
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Be thankful for the small mercies in life.