Scale vs. volume measurement for coffee bean dose - Page 2

Beginner and pro baristas share tips and tricks.
gr2020

#11: Post by gr2020 » Jul 10, 2019, 6:20 pm

Balthazar_B wrote:Same reason why just about every chef worth his/her salt weighs ingredients rather than using volume when assembling components for a recipe. Many even do so with their liquids (as you're doing with milk) for the sake of precision and reproducibility.
Not to go too far off-topic - but is this really true? Based on purely casual observation, it seems like the more experienced the chef, the more likely they are to "eyeball" their quantities...and I think they also have a really good idea how much their "pinch" is for dry ingredients.

Note the above is unrelated to coffee - I'm firmly in the weigh both the dose and output group, at least at home!

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Balthazar_B

#12: Post by Balthazar_B » replying to gr2020 » Jul 10, 2019, 7:47 pm

Well, typically the chef isn't the one doing most of that part of the work anymore. It's the various folks along the line who are measuring and prepping, etc. But because they know the chef is going to taste things at random, they tend to be very meticulous about making sure the expected result is achieved, so doubt there's much slapdash stuff going on in the kitchen. :)
- John

LMWDP # 577

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Balthazar_B

#13: Post by Balthazar_B » Jul 10, 2019, 8:14 pm

Peppersass wrote: However, while weighing both the dose and the shot may be the best advice for home baristas, it may not be the best approach for busy cafes. These days, I'm seeing more and more high-end cafes weigh their shots. Because it merely merely signals when to cut the shot, it doesn't add any time to pulling a shot. But very few of these cafes weigh the dose because that does add time. Instead, they tend to use grinders that offer timed dosing. This isn't super accurate, but is probably more accurate than dosing by eyeballing the volume of grounds.
Aren't there some commercial grinders now that will churn out weighed doses? Don't know how popular they are, but it seems like their attractiveness would be inversely proportional to the skill level of the baristas, who often may not get very much training and not be possessed of much loyalty to their employers. Has anyone reading this used one of these in a commercial setting?
- John

LMWDP # 577

nuketopia

#14: Post by nuketopia » Jul 11, 2019, 12:55 am

A lot of commercial machines use volumetric water control. It measures how many CC of water flow into the brew group. That's pretty darn accurate as well. There are some commercial grinders that dose to weight as well, though timing is still the most common method.

At home, it makes sense to weigh the dose and weigh the shot. We're not in so much of a hurry and I like to get the absolute best out of expensive coffee that I can.

LewBK

#15: Post by LewBK » Jul 11, 2019, 10:01 pm

Wouldn't weighing the beans be less important than weighing the ground coffee because there is always some coffee residue stuck in the grinder via static cling, etc, so your bean weight won't be the same as your ground weight?

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Balthazar_B

#16: Post by Balthazar_B » replying to LewBK » Jul 12, 2019, 12:23 am

A properly engineered and aligned single dosing machine may leave a few hundredths of a gram at most. It's not nothing, but it's insignificant, beyond the resolution of most coffee scales to measure. IOW, we're talking a fraction of a bean.

Of course one can weigh both before and after grinding if one wishes. Just an additional uncomplicated step in the workflow.
- John

LMWDP # 577