Puck paper purveyors? - Page 5

Beginner and pro baristas share tips and tricks for making espresso.
jley08

#41: Post by jley08 »

GDM528 wrote:Brewers concerned about drinking 'essence of filter paper' will rinse all of the papers before using. I don't, but that's just me.

My mid-puck paper goes in dry. The process is already kinda fiddly, so wetting the paper would make it more so. I do wet the bottom paper however, so it will hold in place while I stir and level the first half of the grind.

My stack-up looks like this:
Top Paper (dry)
Half(ish) of grind
Mid Paper (dry)
Half(ish) of grind
Bottom Paper (wet)

Have you tried this method on ultra light filter roasts? If so, how was the taste in the cup. Or does this method work better with medium to dark roasted beans?

GDM528 (original poster)

#42: Post by GDM528 (original poster) »

jley08 wrote: Have you tried this method on ultra light filter roasts? If so, how was the taste in the cup. Or does this method work better with medium to dark roasted beans?
Never tried anything lighter than a medium roast, but FWIW I've not observed any sort of direct relationship between the filter paper and the tasting notes of the shot. The papers can affect how the shot transpires however, and those effects (puck resistance, flow rate, channeling, etc.) follow all the established wisdoms of the HB forums.

For me, the top and bottom papers are there for the sake of cleanliness. The bottom paper stops jets from spraying coffee outside my cup, and the top paper keeps the grounds off the group head so I don't have to flush and wipe it down after every use. So, basically, lazy.

The mid-puck paper, on the other hand, seems to interrupt channel formation from top to bottom. That results in less overall channeling effects, which I observe as reduced sour/acidic notes.

jley08

#43: Post by jley08 replying to GDM528 »


I just tried this method this morning on a manhattan coffee filter ultra light roast. Highly recommended. Thank you!