Please describe the Stockfleth's Move

Beginner and pro baristas share tips and tricks.
shadow745

#1: Post by shadow745 »

I've searched here and there for a good explanation of the often mentioned Stockfleth's Move. I only have slow a$$ dialup, so a video isn't going to do me much good. Could any of you please explain how to do this? Is it a very effective distribution technique? Thanks for any info. Later!

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another_jim
Team HB

#2: Post by another_jim »

PF in your left hand, bring it to your chest, and put your elbow up. Put the fleshy part below your right thumb into the basket, and put your right elbow out too. Now extend both hands away from your chest, bringing the elbows in. This gives a 180 degree rotation of you thumb pad over the grounds, and levels the puck.
Jim Schulman

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Compass Coffee
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#3: Post by Compass Coffee »

another_jim wrote:PF in your left hand, bring it to your chest, and put your elbow up. Put the fleshy part below your right thumb into the basket, and put your right elbow out too. Now extend both hands away from your chest, bringing the elbows in. This gives a 180 degree rotation of you thumbpad over the grounds, and levels the puck.
Oh no!. I've been reverse Stockflething for four years. :shock: I actually use more of the index finger in counter-clockwise motion than thumb pad, but same principle.
Mike McGinness, Head Bean (Owner/Roast Master)
http://www.CompassCoffeeRoasting.com

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another_jim
Team HB

#4: Post by another_jim »

Oops, I forgot to mention that I can't for the life of me recall whether the original moves the hands in or out. However, with my geezer eyesight, getting everything set close to the vest, then pushing out, is a lot easier.
Jim Schulman

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RapidCoffee
Team HB

#5: Post by RapidCoffee » replying to another_jim »

Stockfleth's move video shows elbows initially out, then rotated inwards. (Also a debatable tamping style - but who am I to criticize TW? :twisted: )
____
John

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HB
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#6: Post by HB »

shadow745 wrote:Is it a very effective distribution technique?
It's great for a cafe production environment, but for the home barista, I believe the Weiss Distribution Technique is far superior and nearly idiot proof. When I'm striving for a perfectly even updosed extraction, I combine the two (i.e., WDT first, Stockfleth to finish rather than a level cut).
Dan Kehn

ChrisC

#7: Post by ChrisC »

From Dan's post saying that he uses it when trying to updose, and the description given here of putting the fleshy part of the thumb into the basket, I get the feeling that this move compacts the coffee into the basket, as opposed to a simple level. I'm assuming that it's used at all because the consistency of the motion allows a consistent amount of downward pressure?

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jesawdy

#8: Post by jesawdy »

You move the pile of grinds around the center axis of the portafilter. If you do it right, you can evenly distribute, fill voids, and yes, updose with consistent compression. You can be ginger about it and not updose much if you like.

It is not a leveling technique.... you usually finish with a small pile left behind and have to level with edge of hand, pinky, finger whatever.
Jeff Sawdy

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Jasonian

#9: Post by Jasonian »

What about a flash-based video?

Here's a video that Chris T. of Arizona-coffee.com took of me while I was demonstrating the stockfleth's for someone.

http://www.viddler.com/explore/chris/videos/161/

edit: disregard the horrible art. It was my first time using a Vertex bowl. I got used to to-go cups, which require less foam for art.
Owner - AJ Coffee Company
HB Rocks!

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Fullsack

#10: Post by Fullsack »

Compass Coffee wrote:Oh no!. I've been reverse Stockflething for four years. :shock: I actually use more of the index finger in counter-clockwise motion than thumb pad, but same principle.
I'd been using more of the index finger as well. I started using the correct method and results were not as good. I might just stay with the "mcKoffee Method."
LMWDP #017
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