Newbie Introduction to Espresso - Barista Mechanics [video] - Page 2

Beginner and pro baristas share tips and tricks for making espresso.
john_ertw

#11: Post by john_ertw »

Dan, my suggestion for the diagnostic videos is that you tell the viewers the parameters used for the problem shot and then what changes you made both qualitative such as grind coarser or increase dose as well as quantitative such as made the grinder 2 notches coarser and went from 16g to 17g. The reason I think this will help is because although this forum is filled with recommendations of which way to change things to get better results, numbers are rarely used and for newbies it is hard to know what increase dose means (0.5g or 2g).

Of coarse the disclaimer at the start of the video would be that the specific numbers you used worked for your setup and coffee on the day you filmed and that the numbers can't necessarily be used at home by viewers, but are an illustration to show how large of a change you make to any given parameter when faced with a certain issue.

rjamadagni

#12: Post by rjamadagni »

As a newcomer to the world of espresso, my wife and I both absolutely loved both videos. I am going to bookmark such instructional videos for learning purpose. Thank you for sharing these with us. Is there a specific thread where all such videos are mentioned and critiqued?

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Spitz.me

#13: Post by Spitz.me »

HB wrote:I don't know if you're joking, but yes, the evenness depicted in the video is nothing special.
I'm not joking, it's evident the distribution was spot on. Hmmm I should work more closely on mastering my distribution, that or pay closer attention to see if it's 'nothing special' for me either.
LMWDP #670

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HB (original poster)
Admin

#14: Post by HB (original poster) »

john_ertw wrote:...this forum is filled with recommendations of which way to change things to get better results, numbers are rarely used and for newbies it is hard to know what increase dose means (0.5g or 2g).
Good suggestion, thanks. I keep things general (cool, warm, hot instead of 198°F, 200.5°F, and 202°F), but you're right, someone new to the game wouldn't necessarily know how much a shift that implies. I'll mention that in the next video where we cover common problems.
rjamadagni wrote:Is there a specific thread where all such videos are mentioned and critiqued?
I linked the thread of a few videos like this under Instructional Videos in the FAQs and Favorites, but there really isn't a dedicated thread to-date. If you run across an instructional video that was particularly helpful and doesn't already have a discussion thread, feel free to start one and explain why you liked it (or didn't).

PS: Below is the markup you should use to embed a YouTube video. This is the "long format" URL that appears in the browser address bar with extra parameters removed, not the short one (e.g., http://youtu.be/XCfPJJL9fi0) you see in the "Share" section of the video itself. The format of the URL must be precisely as shown below, i.e., it starts with www and has only one parameter, the v=ABCdef4.
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XCfPJJL9fi0[/youtube]
Dan Kehn

mitch236
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#15: Post by mitch236 »

Dan, I think as time goes on, you could expand your video instructional library to be equipment specific. IOW, since you seem to get your hands on most entry level equipment, perhaps you could have a FAQ section that shows how to dial in shots on a specific piece of equipment. I understand most of it is similar but it would be fun and educational for the newbie to watch his or her exact grinder or machine being dialed in by you.

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beer&mathematics

#16: Post by beer&mathematics »

john_ertw wrote:my suggestion for the diagnostic videos is that you tell the viewers the parameters used for the problem shot and then what changes you made both qualitative such as grind coarser or increase dose as well as quantitative such as made the grinder 2 notches coarser and went from 16g to 17g.
I second that quantitative info would be really helpful. Qualitative is nice, but as a newbie (and possibly since I'm a mathematician) the numbers are helpful to see!
LMWDP #431

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Sherman

#17: Post by Sherman »

Quantitative data are imminently more useful if the equipment is the same, less so as different equipment comes into play. An important point to remember is that there are both absolute and relative quantitative changes (e.g."198F/200F/202F" vs. "cool/warm/hot") changes. Consider the absolute changes for that set of equipment, then make necessary relative adjustments for your equipment. Not everybody has a K10 and 2 group Strada EP at home ;).
Your dog wants espresso.
LMWDP #288

john_ertw

#18: Post by john_ertw »

I agree Sherman, but for a beginner like myself, quantitative data will give a ballpark range to start with. Of course a disclaimer/info is needed to communicate that different equipment will react differently (and maybe the same equipment will react differently on different days).

Like I said before, does an increase in dose mean start with a 0.5g change or a 2g change. Maybe neither of these numbers are good starting points and that's why I suggest it.

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HB (original poster)
Admin

#19: Post by HB (original poster) »

Thanks John et el for the suggestions! I incorporated them into the next of the series, Newbie Introduction to Espresso - Grinders. We'll return to diagnostics in a month or so.
Dan Kehn

borislobb

#20: Post by borislobb »

This is a great video. In particular, I love your great example of "good parenting" at 6:55 .