My coffee from moka pot is extremely bitter

Beginner and pro baristas share tips and tricks.
klemen

Postby klemen » Jun 09, 2018, 5:00 pm

I really like drinking coffee, so that is why I recently bough Moka pot to play around at home before I go into some more expensive equipment.

Down to the chase..Since 2 weeks I struggle to make a DRINKABLE coffee using my moka pot on the induction stove.
I watched a lot of videos all over youtube and nothing helped.
I struggle finding the right temperature:
- if I go a bit higher it starts sparkling and coffee is pretty much ruined
- if I go a bit lower it takes ages for steam to come and ages to fill the upper part, so my assumption is, that it just takes too long and coffee overcooks in the process

Moka pot: https://www.amazon.de/gp/product/B00LK9CNG4/
Coffee: https://www.amazon.de/gp/product/B000S75D66/

Full process:
- Put the coffee in the funnel without pressing it down
- Fill the pot with water (tried hot and cold)
- Put the funnel on
- Screw the collector
- Put it on the induction stove on a low/medium heat
- Wait for bubbling (on low heat takes ages, on medium is too fast)
- Fill the cup with produced coffee

Any ideas what is going so horribly wrong?

jpender

Postby jpender » Jun 09, 2018, 6:32 pm

klemen wrote:I struggle finding the right temperature:
- if I go a bit higher it starts sparkling...


Sparkling? What does that mean?




I'm not sure what your problem is but I found the Illy "Moka grind" coffee to be somewhat too fine a grind for a moka pot.

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Eastsideloco

Postby Eastsideloco » Jun 09, 2018, 7:37 pm

As in bubbling, I presume. boiling, in other words.

Personally, I've enjoyed coffee brewed in a Moka pot for the company (of my host) but never for the cup. I believe that a good tasting cup is possible, based on what I have read here. But it is very difficult avoiding overheating the coffee. Also the brew ratios (coffee:water) are pretty unusual. Starting with fresh-roasted Coffee and grinding to suit the brewer is always a good idea.

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another_jim
Team HB

Postby another_jim » Jun 09, 2018, 7:45 pm

Use very low heat and very coarse grinds. The brewing process should take several minutes and the coffee should come out at a trickle. The grind should be what is suitable for pour over. That will get you a pour over taste. Much more simply, switch to pour over, because if you don't like bitter, the last method you should be using is moka pot.
Jim Schulman

keepitsimple

Postby keepitsimple » Jun 09, 2018, 8:08 pm

Probably the "heat" control on your induction stove isn't fine enough to achieve the heat level needed to operate a moka pot.

I have only a cheap counter top induction, that I rarely use, as I have a 5 burner gas cooktop for most uses. I know that partiular induction device operates simply on a "time fully on/time fully off" ratio depending on how you set the control. The granularity on it is not very fine, and it would be impossible to get the level of heat control needed for a moka pot.

In comparison, gas has a very fine level of heat control which is inuitive to use.

Both aluminium and s/steel Mokas work fine on gas - once starting to brew, ensure heat is right down so the coffee is flowing slowly into the top pot, and turn it off completely before the flow finishes.

Note that S/Steel pots (which I presume yours must be) don't respond quickly to changes in heat input - you have to anticipate and change the heat input in advance.

If you can't get a reasonable balance between too cold/too hot it sounds like your induction stovetop isn't suitable either.

happycat

Postby happycat » Jun 09, 2018, 8:30 pm

klemen wrote:I really like drinking coffee, so that is why I recently bough Moka pot to play around at home before I go into some more expensive equipment.

Down to the chase..Since 2 weeks I struggle to make a DRINKABLE coffee using my moka pot on the induction stove.
I watched a lot of videos all over youtube and nothing helped.
I struggle finding the right temperature:
- if I go a bit higher it starts sparkling and coffee is pretty much ruined
- if I go a bit lower it takes ages for steam to come and ages to fill the upper part, so my assumption is, that it just takes too long and coffee overcooks in the process

Moka pot: https://www.amazon.de/gp/product/B00LK9CNG4/
Coffee: https://www.amazon.de/gp/product/B000S75D66/

Full process:
- Put the coffee in the funnel without pressing it down
- Fill the pot with water (tried hot and cold)
- Put the funnel on
- Screw the collector
- Put it on the induction stove on a low/medium heat
- Wait for bubbling (on low heat takes ages, on medium is too fast)
- Fill the cup with produced coffee

Any ideas what is going so horribly wrong?


Brew ratio (gm of coffee to gm of water) can be important. I switched from 1:10 to 1:17 and a much finer grind, having the coffee come out much slower, and I enjoyed it more.

Also I use filtered water (Mavea which I believe is German)

And I take the moka pot off the heat when the coffee output starts turning blond... before it starts sputtering

And you can add a bit of filtered water to your cup after to tone down the concentrated flavours and draw them out into more gentle flavours

Capac

Postby Capac » Jun 11, 2018, 3:23 am

For me (3 cup bialetti moka express), here are the steps:
-clean your moka prior to using
-grind your own coffee, preground stuff for moka is way too fine
-I use cold water, but hot water works aswell
-use medium heat
-take it off the stove once it starts girgling and cool it down

I manage to get 16-17g into my 3 cup.

I'm pretty sure grinding coarse would solve your problem

I prefer moka to any filter coffee, paper filters out some of the good stuff IMO.