Milk Frothing Pitchers or Jugs - Favorites - Page 3

Beginner and pro baristas share tips and tricks.
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spressomon

Postby spressomon » May 15, 2018, 11:18 pm

Cafelat microfiber towels are thick. The only negative I have found with them: The black color variant will bleed its dye when washed for several cycles.
No Espresso = Depresso

Charlene

Postby Charlene » May 16, 2018, 5:23 pm

EvergreenBuzzBuzz wrote:I am looking for a new 12oz / 350ml jug.

Seems like four of the favorites right now are from Decent, Barista Hustle, Espro Toroid, and Motta.

https://decentespresso.com/milk_jug



The DE pitcher was the last brand I bought. It is also the first pitcher I used when I finally finally finally achieved true wet paint textured froth.

That said, I really find it hard to believe different shapes/brands of jugs really makes very much difference.

I view this like I view golf clubs with marketing promises of lowering your handicap. One's skill with a golf club is much more critical than the design of the clubs.

When you figure out how to get that wet paint texture, you can likely do it with any jug design.

I just happen to like the aesthetics of the DE jug.

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bluesman

Postby bluesman » May 17, 2018, 7:21 am

Charlene wrote:When you figure out how to get that wet paint texture, you can likely do it with any jug design.

Right! It ain't what you use, it's how you use it (yes, he's using a paper cup as a pitcher)...


EvergreenBuzzBuzz

Postby EvergreenBuzzBuzz » May 17, 2018, 5:49 pm

Got the STAR pitcher from Amazon today.
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B01 ... UTF8&psc=1

Very happy with the milk quality. If you notice the image on Amazon you can see that you can't really do 12oz of steamed milk in the 12oz one. I did 4 and 6 no issues. 8 may not even be possible unless you steam really slowly. I will have to test it. But for $13 it seems great. Also comes with a free eBook covering various coffee facts, history and recipes.
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Charlene

Postby Charlene » May 18, 2018, 3:17 pm

bluesman wrote:Right! It ain't what you use, it's how you use it (yes, he's using a paper cup as a pitcher)...


Perfect case in point, Bluesman.

I also quit using a thermometer when frothing.

Seems to disturb the path of the milk swirling around while steaming. Not saying that is a fact; just saying I suspect that to be the case from empirical observations.

EvergreenBuzzBuzz

Postby EvergreenBuzzBuzz » replying to Charlene » May 18, 2018, 3:21 pm

I use one after steaming, but only while learning a new jug. "Oh on this jug this is what 130 feels like".
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Charlene

Postby Charlene » replying to EvergreenBuzzBuzz » May 18, 2018, 3:54 pm

That makes perfect sense to me, Buzz, and is a good suggestion. ;-)

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bluesman

Postby bluesman » May 18, 2018, 4:56 pm

EvergreenBuzzBuzz wrote: If you notice the image on Amazon you can see that you can't really do 12oz of steamed milk in the 12oz one. I did 4 and 6 no issues. 8 may not even be possible unless you steam really slowly.

A fluid ounce is a measure of volume - 12 fl oz tells you the size of the pitcher, not how much milk you can steam in it. A 12 fl oz pitcher is best for 4 or 5 oz of milk and certainly no more than 6. You're stretching it in volume by at least 25% to make a "proper" cappuccino and as much as 40% for a latte (although 40% is a bit stiff for art). You need that space above your foamed milk so that you don't blow it all over when swirling and tapping to break up bubbles.

I use 4 oz in a 12 oz pitcher for a standard 5 to 6 oz capp and 6 oz in a 16 oz pitcher for an 8 oz drink (eg when I'm sitting and reading or watching the morning news on TV) - and I almost always pour out the last ounce+. I have a 20 oz pitcher that I've used mostly to foam for two capps at the same time. I bought it because there was open space on my shelf and it looks good sitting there :D

EvergreenBuzzBuzz

Postby EvergreenBuzzBuzz » May 18, 2018, 6:45 pm

bluesman wrote:. I bought it because there was open space on my shelf and it looks good sitting there :D

Same with the cardboard cutout of Jack Sparrow we have to haunt our guests visiting the house. Your explanation of the sizes makes much sense. We are using the 12oz with 4-6oz of milk. Lots of learning in progress with Capt Jack.
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shong008

Postby shong008 » May 21, 2018, 7:56 pm

bluesman wrote:Right! It ain't what you use, it's how you use it (yes, he's using a paper cup as a pitcher)...



Totally with you guys on this one. I ended up buying 10 pitchers because my latte art was not improving. Recently I figured out that the problem wasn't the jugs that I was using, but it was getting the milk texturing right. I will say that the spout design and its symmetry is important when you are pouring different latte art designs, but learning to get the milk texturing right will be your first homework to improving your latte art.