Microfoam for fast vs. slow milk steaming espresso machines - Page 2

Beginner and pro baristas share tips and tricks.
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drgary
Team HB

#11: Post by drgary »

another_jim wrote:no tearing, stretching, or other drama.

If your tip does lots of drama and FX when it steams, it probably isn't that good.
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Later add: Not so fast, and thank you, Dennis (below) for noticing this method doesn't work for some machines.
Gary
LMWDP#308

What I WOULD do for a good cup of coffee!

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tekomino

#12: Post by tekomino »

another_jim wrote: You flush the tip, stick it straight in the milk, heat it in a few seconds, let the tip give it all the swirl it needs, then you stop steaming and wait for the milk to get a texture like latex paint (giving it an occasional swirl). Then it's ready to pour.
I really have not observed this. You must incorporate some air in order to get texture. I have not seen this with any machine I used, and I used lot of them. My current machine steams in couple of seconds with 4 hole tip. It does not do this. I tried it on Elektra Semiautomatica, it does not do this. You must be getting at least some air into the mix with tip not being completely submerged into the milk to get it to thicken up to latex texture. I'd love if it were easy like described, but its just not my experience.
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michaelbenis

#13: Post by michaelbenis »

Well, it's a funny thing, experience....

I'm afraid I'm with Jim on this: the steam does a fine job on its own and the waiting is not to be underestimated. Many people overheat the milk - maybe that's why you find letter some air in helpful?

I find baristas tend to vastly overcomplicate what they get up to with steaming and to the detriment of consistent good results.

If the wand has been designed well and the boiler pressure is up to par, keep it simple rules - and that is my experience of a very wide range of machines, domestic and commercial pump models through to domestic and commercial lever machines.

If you want to get thick milk for a solid-capped cappuccino air entrainment won't be the end of the world, but it doesn't help for microfoaming since it gives you a coarser texture that frankly isn't either necessary or desirable for a traditional cappuccino never mind being a disaster for latte art....
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tekomino

#14: Post by tekomino »

I am definitely not overheating, but if I just drop the steam tip in and let it swirl it will thicken up a bit after waiting, but not enough for any latter art. Not to latex paint thickness. You just have to take little bit of air in.... I mean if it was that simple nobody would have problems with steaming milk but most of people do... Perhaps you guys mean you let it stretch a bit but surely you don't immerse tip all the way in to get latex paint thickness to the milk.... It just does not work.

I would love it if it were that simple, trust me I tried it, its not, which to me then means we are not doing the same thing...
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espressotime

#15: Post by espressotime »

Strega is fast.Milk for two cappu's takes about 6 seconds for microfoam.love it.
Grind,rake ,tamp and enjoy a great espresso.( by F. G.)

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drgary
Team HB

#16: Post by drgary »

I agree with Dennis that Jim's simplified method doesn't work for some machines. I usually get good results with my Pavoni and Isomac Amica using low-fat soy and skim cow's milk. But Jim's method makes me a cafe con leche -- hot milk, no foam at all. I've seen professional baristas using a La Marzocco Linea completely immerse the tip for successful microfoaming of soy and regular milk. Maybe the intensity of steaming makes the difference.
Gary
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What I WOULD do for a good cup of coffee!

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jfrescki

#17: Post by jfrescki »

On my EPC-8, I can easily end up with hot milk if I don't introduce air, and I literally mean hot milk - no thicker than pouring it from the container.
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Javier

#18: Post by Javier »

tekomino wrote: I mean if it was that simple nobody would have problems with steaming milk but most of people do... Perhaps you guys mean you let it stretch a bit but surely you don't immerse tip all the way in to get latex paint thickness to the milk.... It just does not work.
I used to own an Astra Pro, and it came with a 4-holes steam wand tip. The only way I was able to produce "latex paint" consistency in the microfoam was following Jim's suggestions of immersing the tip (but not all the way down).
drgary wrote:I agree with Dennis that Jim's simplified method doesn't work for some machines.

I do not believe Jim presented a "simplified method" but just a broad overview (i.e., without having to go into details) of microfoaming with 3-5 holes tips versus 1-2 holes tips.
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tekomino

#19: Post by tekomino »

Javier wrote:I used to own an Astra Pro, and it came with a 4-holes steam wand tip. The only way I was able to produce "latex paint" consistency in the microfoam was following Jim's suggestions of immersing the tip (but not all the way down).
I have 4-hole steaming monster, but you have to let air in or all you will be getting is warmed up milk...
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peacecup

#20: Post by peacecup »

Isn't the steam from the boiler full of air too? I've always found if I sink the tip completely I end up with hot milk too. But maybe some machines are different. With my little Export toy I think I let a little air in. Toy that it is, it also steams a cappas' worth of milk in the 10 sec or so that it takes the lever to rise during the shot pull.

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