Latte Heart Size - Page 4

Beginner and pro baristas share tips and tricks for making espresso.
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mrgnomer

#31: Post by mrgnomer »

By trade I'm a plasterer of sorts. Took me a couple years just to get close to a good finish. I remember watching journeymen in awe of their magic. After maybe 2 years my hands found the magic and after 10 got really good at it. There's a lot of minute movements you need to control in response to fine counter pressures you don't even know exist until you develop a feel for them. Theory only gets you so far. The mastery is in the hands, if that makes sense. When the hands know the feel you can make it look easy. Hopefully I won't have to hack it out for 10 years before getting a feel for latte hearts.
Kirk
LMWDP #116
professionals do it for the pay, amateurs do it for the love

DerSchoeneBahnhof (original poster)

#32: Post by DerSchoeneBahnhof (original poster) »

Whew, I am finally getting some amount of definition in the heart (I wiggled), though still looking a bit like an onion. I probably pulled through too low.

You are right, practice is key. And a pour like this is over in seconds, no time to think too much.

Pour, rinse, repeat...


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mrgnomer

#33: Post by mrgnomer »

Very nice. I am inspired. I am still working on it. Getting closer but not good enough to share.

Good work. I am trying not to be envious.
Kirk
LMWDP #116
professionals do it for the pay, amateurs do it for the love

DerSchoeneBahnhof (original poster)

#34: Post by DerSchoeneBahnhof (original poster) »

Oh, it's very frustrating how much time to takes. I am up to 3 or 4 attempts a day (mostly tulips and hearts, attempting rosettas) for the last few months (using already extracted ground beans + Barista Carl Blend). And I still mess up steaming more often than I wish. What do they say, 10'000 hours to get good at something? :wink:

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Kaffee Bitte

#35: Post by Kaffee Bitte »

Hearts are definitely a quick one. Onions, garlic cloves, pumpkins, ginkgo leaves are all things I get when I wobble wrongly. Still a pleasing shape if I get definition.
You are definitely improving. Like anything else it's just practice until it is easy.
Lynn G.
LMWDP # 110
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mrgnomer

#36: Post by mrgnomer »

DerSchoeneBahnhof wrote: What do they say, 10'000 hours to get good at something? :wink:
I find it takes around 2 years. 2 years to get good, a lifetime to master.

:)
Kirk
LMWDP #116
professionals do it for the pay, amateurs do it for the love

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mrgnomer

#37: Post by mrgnomer »

It's not defined and the heart/ apple pour was more accidental but it's getting there, I think.

Kirk
LMWDP #116
professionals do it for the pay, amateurs do it for the love

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mrgnomer

#38: Post by mrgnomer »

Getting micromentally closer.

Stretched milk temperature seems to be more important than I thought. Normally I hold the pitcher cupped in my hand and stop when it gets close to uncomfortable hot. I used a thermometer and 140F is in the too hot to hold range.

So I'm holding the pitcher by the handle now and using a finger to gauge temp and listening for a deepening in the tear sound and stopping at too hot to touch. It pours with definition better. Still working on the heart.

Kirk
LMWDP #116
professionals do it for the pay, amateurs do it for the love

DerSchoeneBahnhof (original poster)

#39: Post by DerSchoeneBahnhof (original poster) »

Aw, that is really cute and good definition. Nice 8)

Am still struggling with the ripple heart. I'll get there one day. Once the ripple base is mastered, that seems to be the base for tulips and rosettas as well.

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Kaffee Bitte

#40: Post by Kaffee Bitte »

mrgnomer wrote: So I'm holding the pitcher by the handle now and using a finger to gauge temp and listening for a deepening in the tear sound and stopping at too hot to touch. It pours with definition better. Still working on the heart.

image
The sound alone can become a good way of temping a drink. Some commercial machines I have used could kind of start it and set it to texturing and go work on the shots etc. It doesn't take long to develop working in a shop. At home, could take a while, but you can listen and touch, but also verify what your senses are telling you with a thermometer. Take note of temps as the tone changes and you will be practicing at a bit deeper level.

The sound will actually guide you past too hot to touch, all the way to 160 and beyond if you are so inclined. Worth a listen or two to hear it at least. Can be a bit deafening though.
Lynn G.
LMWDP # 110
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