Latte Heart Size - Page 3

Beginner and pro baristas share tips and tricks for making espresso.
DerSchoeneBahnhof (original poster)

#21: Post by DerSchoeneBahnhof (original poster) »

Thanks for the encouraging words.

Well, at least I nailed the steaming part today - not a perfect heart. It's a start. What was left in the pitcher was still nicely (micro) foamy and not watery like I usually get.



Also, the milk was freshly bought yesterday. I never use milk past the expiration date and I seem to get better results with fresh milk.

Huh, maybe I should get a cow in the backyard? Unfortunately, city codes don't allow cows on parcels smaller that 40 acres :lol:

Cheers,
CG

Pressino

#22: Post by Pressino »

DerSchoeneBahnhof wrote:Thanks for the encouraging words.

Also, the milk was freshly bought yesterday. I never use milk past the expiration date and I seem to get better results with fresh milk.

Huh, maybe I should get a cow in the backyard? Unfortunately, city codes don't allow cows on parcels smaller that 40 acres :lol:

Cheers,
CG
I believe the county ordinance specifies a minimum lot size of 40,000 square feet, which comes to a bit under 1 acre. It also allows two cows or goats, and you probably have some neighbors with lots that size that might be willing to host these animals and share the milk. I haven't tried goat milk in caps or lattes, but if it works for you the goats would be a lot smaller than milk cows.

BTW, the heart looks very nice.

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mrgnomer

#23: Post by mrgnomer »

That is a nice heart. Let the muscle memory begin :lol:
Kirk
LMWDP #116
professionals do it for the pay, amateurs do it for the love

DerSchoeneBahnhof (original poster)

#24: Post by DerSchoeneBahnhof (original poster) »

I believe the county ordinance specifies a minimum lot size of 40,000 square feet, which comes to a bit under 1 acre. It also allows two cows or goats, and you probably have some neighbors with lots that size that might be willing to host these animals and share the milk. I haven't tried goat milk in caps or lattes, but if it works for you the goats would be a lot smaller than milk cows.
Hmm, really? Either way, I don't even have 40'000 square feet, and I can't imagine my wife dealing with the smell of the big blobs of uh, stuff, that the cows leave behind :-)

Oh well, back to latte art. :wink:

DerSchoeneBahnhof (original poster)

#25: Post by DerSchoeneBahnhof (original poster) »

mrgnomer wrote:That is a nice heart. Let the muscle memory begin :lol:
Hmm, so, what is the secret to the rippled heart? I can't get anywhere close to it yet.

My steaming has improved quite a bit recently, but maybe I am overstretching which makes the foam too thick? Whether I ripple or not, the heart is just plain flat. :?

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mrgnomer

#26: Post by mrgnomer »

Ripple heart I'm not sure but what works for a rosetta is wiggling the pour just when it starts to surface from one end of the cup to the other and finishing back down through the middle. I'm still trying to get the hang of a simple heart. It is similar to the rosetta but slower I think.
Kirk
LMWDP #116
professionals do it for the pay, amateurs do it for the love

DerSchoeneBahnhof (original poster)

#27: Post by DerSchoeneBahnhof (original poster) replying to mrgnomer »

Ah yes, something like this? (used beans, fake milk, so low contrast)



It would seem that the rosetta wiggle is a tad easier than the heart since you are pulling away while doing so. I am still not able to have definition on my hearts (though I get a really nice heart shape if I start at the right time, cup about 2/3 full).

On to more practice!

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mrgnomer

#28: Post by mrgnomer »

Yes, that's it. Nice rosetta.

The heart I'm finding is a slower almost more controlled timing and rhythm. A slow motion rosetta approach is getting me close to pouring out something that looks like a heart but it's nothing I'm satisfied with yet.
Kirk
LMWDP #116
professionals do it for the pay, amateurs do it for the love

DerSchoeneBahnhof (original poster)

#29: Post by DerSchoeneBahnhof (original poster) »

Ugh, I find if I pour the heart too slow, the shape doesn't expand as quickly.

Frustrating that it looks so easy in Lance Hedrick's videos :| He can even manage a heart with good definition from various pouring heights where he demonstrates what happens if you pour too high or too low. Sure, there is a loss of contrast when you pour too high, but besides that, the heart still looks nice.

I'll probably get it one day, just like steaming "clicked" after a few months. Patience I guess...

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mrgnomer

#30: Post by mrgnomer »

IMHO it's muscle memory. With rosettas I remember getting it right by random accident enough times my hands kind of gave my head the finger and took over. My head later started getting interested with what my hands were doing and then they started working together.

There's pouring too slow, which is what I do too, pouring too fast and then there's the Goldilocks just right. Still working on the just right.

Intuition is hard to control if you think and try too hard. You usually end up over working it.

I need a poster of Obi Wan to remind me to trust the force when I'm pouring hearts.
Kirk
LMWDP #116
professionals do it for the pay, amateurs do it for the love