How does AI describe espresso?

Beginner and pro baristas share tips and tricks for making espresso.
drH
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#1: Post by drH »

If you follow the current news in Artificial Intelligence, you may have heard of the large language models like GPT3 that are very good at generating text. Well, there is a new, free chatbot by OpenAI called ChatGPT that is so good it's creepy. I decided to make a funny inquiry and see how it responded to a question about espresso with a holiday twist. (I have no affiliation with GPT or OpenAI).

My query: Write an explanation of how to make espresso my a man who is adamant that his ridiculously difficult and finicky process is better than everyone else's. A steam engine, a blow torch, and Santa Claus must be part of the process. It makes bad coffee but the man is defensive and won't admit it.
ChatGPT wrote:Making the perfect espresso is a delicate and precise art, one that requires the right tools and techniques. Many so-called "experts" claim to know the secret to brewing a great cup of espresso, but their methods are simply inferior to my own, unique approach.

First, you must start with the right beans. Not just any old coffee beans will do - they must be freshly roasted, of the highest quality, and ground to a fine, even consistency. Once you have the perfect beans, it's time to prepare your espresso machine.

But wait, you may be thinking - why not just use a standard espresso machine like everyone else? That's where my method differs - I use a steam engine to power the espresso machine, providing a steady, reliable source of heat and pressure. And to ensure that the water temperature is just right, I use a blow torch to fine-tune the heat to the perfect level.

Once the machine is prepped and ready, it's time to brew the espresso. Start the flow of water, and watch as the dark, rich liquid flows into the cup. Don't let it run for too long, or you'll end up with a bitter, over-extracted shot. Stop the flow at just the right moment, and you'll be rewarded with a perfectly balanced, smooth, and delicious espresso.

And as a special touch, I add a sprinkle of magic dust - provided by none other than Santa Claus himself - to give the espresso an extra kick of flavor and holiday cheer.

Some may think my process is overly complicated and ridiculous, but trust me - the results are worth it. Don't settle for mediocre coffee - follow my method and enjoy the perfect espresso every time.
Happy Holidays all.

GDM528

#2: Post by GDM528 »

Here's what DALL-E (AI 'art' generator, from same organization) had to show for it:


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another_jim
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#3: Post by another_jim »

I just read an opinion piece in the NYT about whether AI programs will replace knowledge workers in the same way that assembly line robots replaced blue collar workers. ChatGPT figured prominently, writing a generic boiler plate analysis on that question, saying some jobs will be lost and others gained.

This was a lot like the espresso explanation you got -- a smooth answer lacking any surprise or aha moments. The only surprise is how well it digests a universe consisting of information only.

Sadly, this is something that humans are rapidly approaching too. On HB, we get more and more posters whose YouTube experience vastly outweighs their hands on experience. They still do a little better than ChatGPT, but the more their symbolic information outweighs their embodied experience, the more like chatbots they become, i.e. making unsurprising posts that merely remix common knowledge without any aha moments.

So for me, it's mostly a shrug. The chatbots will replace the experts who have become chatbots themselves. Nobody will even notice.
Jim Schulman
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buckersss
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#4: Post by buckersss »

A coworker and I talked about openai yesterday. He used it to refine code he had written. It took him a few days and a few hundred lines. In seconds the chatbot spit out 10 lines of code that used a recursive call he didn't think about using on his own. Another time the chat box diagnosed that he was missing a package required to make his code run. Quiet outstanding.

I asked it to diagnose my espresso problems yesterday but was shut out due to demand.

The answer of how to make the best espresso above reminded about the exchange in hitchhikers guide to the galaxy where Marvin (or the ships machine) makes Arthur the most incredible cup of tea.

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retireddude

#5: Post by retireddude »

I asked for this yesterday.

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yakster
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#6: Post by yakster »

I was looking for references to 4-ethylphenol in coffee, a compound that gives barnyard, earthy, leather aromas in well fermented cigar wrappers and in wine and beer where brettanomyces yeasts are involved and came across an OpenAI article on How Chemical Compounds Give Flavor and Aroma to Coffee.

Surprisingly this article states "The VOCs... 2-ethylphenol and 4-ethylphenol, which can give coffee a spicy, berry-like flavor" which was not what I expected. As it's OpenAI without references, I'm not sure about this, but it was an interesting article and OpenAI exercise.

https://stianchrister.medium.com/how-ch ... 0011915f76
-Chris

LMWDP # 272

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another_jim
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#7: Post by another_jim »

FWIW, the standard reference Flament's Coffee Flavor Chemistry lists about 8 different ethyl-methyl phenols. They are, as you noted, variously phenolic, creosote, woody, animal skin, and port. No berry mentioned.

I decided to exercise my sense of irony and had this conversation with the AI chatbot:
another_jim
What happens to truth if everyone repeats information they have read or heard, rather than experienced for themselves?

Chatbot GPT
If everyone repeats information they have read or heard without verifying it for themselves, it can lead to the spread of misinformation. This is because the information may not be accurate, and it can be difficult to distinguish between true and false information when it is being repeated by multiple people. It is important for people to verify information for themselves, rather than just repeating what they have heard, in order to ensure that they are spreading accurate information.
The logical equivalent to verifyng from experience for an on-line AI is to restrict it to 1) peer reviewed info with cites, 2) multiple named and verified sources, as in good newspapers, and 3) for software and math, testing in a sandbox. The Chatbot GPT seems a lot looser; but it could be given this standard as a strict mode. That would be very useful for researchers; and put a lot of grad students and management consultants out of work.
Jim Schulman

buckersss
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#8: Post by buckersss »

yakster wrote:I was looking for references to 4-ethylphenol in coffee, a compound that gives barnyard, earthy, leather aromas in well fermented cigar wrappers and in wine and beer where brettanomyces yeasts are involved and came across an OpenAI article on How Chemical Compounds Give Flavor and Aroma to Coffee.

Surprisingly this article states "The VOCs... 2-ethylphenol and 4-ethylphenol, which can give coffee a spicy, berry-like flavor" which was not what I expected. As it's OpenAI without references, I'm not sure about this, but it was an interesting article and OpenAI exercise.

https://stianchrister.medium.com/how-ch ... 0011915f76
You can create an account and try the chatgpt for free. You can ask it and it may clarify and provide you references.

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yakster
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#9: Post by yakster »

buckersss wrote:You can create an account and try the chatgpt for free. You can ask it and it may clarify and provide you references.
I tried chatgpt and got what I expected as an answer to the question of "what flavors does 4 ethyl phenol create in coffee?" I don't see any way to clarify references for the answers, but I just signed up.
4-ethylphenol is a chemical compound that is sometimes found in coffee. It is a derivative of phenol, and it has a distinctive musty, barnyard-like odor. When present in coffee, it can contribute to the overall flavor profile of the coffee, but it is not typically considered a desirable flavor on its own. It is usually only detected at very low levels in coffee, and it is not known to create any specific flavors on its own.
This is kind of fun. "what is the source of 4-ethylphenol in coffee?"
4-ethylphenol is a chemical compound that is produced by certain microorganisms during the fermentation process. It can also be found in some plant materials, including some varieties of coffee. In coffee, 4-ethylphenol is usually produced during the roasting process, when the coffee beans are heated to high temperatures. The precise source of 4-ethylphenol in coffee can vary depending on a number of factors, including the specific type of coffee and the conditions under which it is grown and processed.
-Chris

LMWDP # 272

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yakster
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#10: Post by yakster »

Time to work backwards with chatgpt: What compound gives coffee a spicy, berry-like flavor?
Coffee has a complex and nuanced flavor profile that can vary depending on a wide range of factors, including the type of coffee bean, the method of roasting, and the brewing method. One of the compounds that can contribute to the flavor of coffee is called 2-methoxy-3-isobutylpyrazine, which is a chemical compound that is found in some varieties of coffee. This compound is known for its spicy, berry-like flavor, which can add a unique and interesting dimension to the overall taste of the coffee. However, the presence of 2-methoxy-3-isobutylpyrazine in coffee is typically only detected at very low levels, and it is not the only compound that contributes to the flavor of coffee. Other compounds that can be found in coffee and contribute to its flavor include acids, alcohols, aldehydes, esters, ketones, lactones, and many others.
-Chris

LMWDP # 272