Grams of milk in a cappuccino

Beginner and pro baristas share tips and tricks for making espresso.
LittleCoffee

#1: Post by LittleCoffee »

I've searched and I've searched, and I'm really struggling to find anywhere that tells me how many grams of milk there are in a cappuccino?

Everywhere people refer to ml or oz in a way which makes me doubt whether they mean mass or volume (even though those are units of volume, I'm not sure how much people really understand that), or unhelpful things like ratios (e.g. 1/3 coffee, 1/3 steam milk 1/3 milk), which definitely refer to volume.

As of yet I don't have an accurate way of measuring the volume of crema, nor my foam. Do you? I do have a scale which measures mass though, but I just have no idea how much milk to be weighing out? Can you help?

I have a 200ml Loveramics cappuccino cup. I am typically pulling 14g doses of coffee to 28-36g of espresso. What mass of cold milk would you put in your pitcher if you wanted a cappuccino? I have been doing 130-140g, but that really seems to make a latte in a cappuccino cup and definitely tastes barely like coffee.

And if there is a "killer post" which nails this basic simple thing, I'm sorry but I haven't found it.

Thanks in advance!

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baldheadracing
Team HB

#2: Post by baldheadracing »

The 'certified' Italian cappuccino is 25ml espresso with 100ml of frothed milk and foam. http://www.inei.coffee/en/

By mass that's roughly 15g of espresso (about a 7g dose) and about 60g of cold milk before steaming.

Double the above for what it sounds like you're pulling.
-"Good quality brings happiness as you use it" - Nobuho Miya, Kamasada

LittleCoffee (original poster)

#3: Post by LittleCoffee (original poster) »

Thanks for that - really helpful.

So I've definitely been making cappuccino volume lattes which explains why they taste so milky. And the answer is less mass od milk frothed to a higher volume rather than more coffee. This mornings effort was a big improvement for which I am grateful.

I've also just seen that loveramics do a 150ml latte cup. What would the cappuccino 15g->30-35g coffee:120g cold milk translate to if I'm trying to pull latte art in a 150ml latte cup?

Thanks again.

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espressotime

#4: Post by espressotime »

LittleCoffee wrote:I've searched and I've searched, and I'm really struggling to find anywhere that tells me how many grams of milk there are in a cappuccino?

Everywhere people refer to ml or oz in a way which makes me doubt whether they mean mass or volume (even though those are units of volume, I'm not sure how much people really understand that), or unhelpful things like ratios (e.g. 1/3 coffee, 1/3 steam milk 1/3 milk), which definitely refer to volume.

As of yet I don't have an accurate way of measuring the volume of crema, nor my foam. Do you? I do have a scale which measures mass though, but I just have no idea how much milk to be weighing out? Can you help?

I have a 200ml Loveramics cappuccino cup. I am typically pulling 14g doses of coffee to 28-36g of espresso. What mass of cold milk would you put in your pitcher if you wanted a cappuccino? I have been doing 130-140g, but that really seems to make a latte in a cappuccino cup and definitely tastes barely like coffee.

And if there is a "killer post" which nails this basic simple thing, I'm sorry but I haven't found it.

Thanks in advance!
Why do you even care how much milk goes into the espresso?
Sometimes I make a double shot of espresso in a small cappu cup and fill it to the top.Sometimes I add a spoon of steamed milk to an espresso.And everything in between
Coffees differ in taste.Just add as much milk as you like.There isn't a cappuccino-police tapping you on the shoulder saying you are doing it all wrong.

mgrayson
Supporter ♡

#5: Post by mgrayson replying to espressotime »

"Excuse me, Ma'am, but you're in violation of the Cortado Act of 2024, Section 3, Paragraph 12. I'm going to have to ask you to pour that into the sink."

LittleCoffee (original poster)

#6: Post by LittleCoffee (original poster) »

Why do you even care how much milk goes into the espresso?
Sometimes I make a double shot of espresso in a small cappu cup and fill it to the top.Sometimes I add a spoon of steamed milk to an espresso.And everything in between
Coffees differ in taste.Just add as much milk as you like.There isn't a cappuccino-police tapping you on the shoulder saying you are doing it all wrong.
Sure - those are all true. But I have a drink that's too milky for my taste. I could do any of the following:

(a) Pull more water through the same mass of beans
(b) Pull less water through the same mass of beans
(c) use a smaller cup and pour more milk
(d) steam more volume of milk from less milk

And I could go off and try each of these (and some more I haven't thought of) and either drink lots more "milkier than I'd like" drinks while I figure it out or pour them down the drain which doesn't seem optimal.

OR.... I could just ask in a forum for some advice and get to a better answer quicker by benefitting from someone helpful's experience, which is what I did.

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RapidCoffee
Team HB

#7: Post by RapidCoffee »

I think the answer is obvious: if your coffee is too milky, use less milk. :wink:
John

InfamousTuba

#8: Post by InfamousTuba »

LittleCoffee wrote: (a) Pull more water through the same mass of beans
(b) Pull less water through the same mass of beans
(c) use a smaller cup and pour more milk
(d) steam more volume of milk from less milk
So you have four options, if your espresso tastes good on it's own then I wouldn't adjust it too much so I wouldn't bother with (a) or (b) for now. You could use a smaller cup, but buying one to try it seems like a waste. You could just pour less milk in the same size cup, although latte art will be harder you can weigh how much milk you add. More foam is another good option, especially if you like the taste of it.

As far as measuring the amount of crema (although not very important), something like this shot glass would help with crema (although the volume of crema isn't really important: https://www.shopcoffee.co.uk/product/ba ... t-3oz80ml/
And for foam, a pitcher with volume measurements on the inside like the decent pitcher (or a cheaper alternative) would allow you to see how much air you are putting in your milk: https://decentespresso.com/milk_jug

For a 150ml cup with 30g of espresso I can fit about 115g of milk in but that is for a flat white. For a cappuccino I would be closer to 100ml I would suspect then, I just prefer drinks with less foam and that is one problem with trying standardise drinks, it is more about personal preference than having some exact specification that needs to be followed

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Jeff
Team HB

#9: Post by Jeff »

Very roughly, well-textured milk is about twice its "flat" volume. For classic caps, I find the size of the pitcher limits how small I can go, rather than the target volume. Steaming much less than 50 g or so can be challenging.

Edit: "Dry foam", part of the older definitions, seems to have fallen out of favor in many places. Uniform "microfoam" seems to be a preference for some styles.

LittleCoffee (original poster)

#10: Post by LittleCoffee (original poster) »

Thanks Jeff - that kind of rule of thumb was exactly what I was after.
though I have to to say 1:2 cold milk volume:microfoam volume seems awful high to me - is that really right?

That would imply for my 200ml cappuccino cup if I take say 40ml (estimating wildly) of volume for my 35g of espresso, I'm left with 160ml for the milk. So you'd be steaming 80g of cold milk to double volume? that's little over half of the milk I've been doing - have i really been off by that much? I'm not even sure I'll be able to froth it that much - but if this is correct, it would explain why my cappuccino basically tastes like milk that's been shown a coffee but from a safe distance only. But will give it a shot.

Otherwise it feels like if I want to do latte art and not drink too milky a coffee I should buy a 150ml cup and then go for 100g of cold milk or so.