Fluke 187 temperature probe

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yodil
Posts: 17
Joined: 3 months ago

#1: Post by yodil »

Hi,

Does anyone have experience with Fluke temperature probes. I'm shopping online for one and the Fluke brand is pretty expensive and the shipping takes forever in Canada. Did anyone use a temperature probe besides Fluke that is compatible with the Fluke multimeter and that is almost as accurate. I want to put a probe over the puck while brewing as I read in another post on HB.

Thank you

ira
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#2: Post by ira »

Assuming you have a Fluke meter and the banana to thermocouple adapter, any K type thermocouple should work, though you should check the manual for your meter to make sure it specifies K type. I've never seen a thermocouple with banana plugs, but if you just got cheap bare wire end thermocouples and a couple of banana jacks with screw terminals on the end, it would probably work about as well other than having a slight offset which you could test with boiling water.

yodil (original poster)
Posts: 17
Joined: 3 months ago

#3: Post by yodil (original poster) »

Thanks for the reply

Should I worry about the waterproofness of the Type K probe ? I found this for example:

https://www.amazon.ca/80BK-Type-Thermoc ... 09P4ZY2QZ/

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JohnB.
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#4: Post by JohnB. »

I've used a variety of different brand thermocouples with my Fluke 54-2. The main thing is to do a corrected boiling water calibration with whichever t/c you buy. Does the 187 allow you to enter an offset if required?
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ira
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#5: Post by ira »

Before I spent $50 on something like that and you ac wait a couple of weeks, I'd spend the $3.11 on this and see if it would be useful to have a better one.

https://www.amazon.ca/Speaker-Connector ... B0CPY4B46H

yodil (original poster)
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Joined: 3 months ago

#6: Post by yodil (original poster) »

Yes it does, so if I understand, I could use a thermocouple, even if its not labeled as waterproof. Of course, it should handle high temperatures.


yodil (original poster)
Posts: 17
Joined: 3 months ago

#7: Post by yodil (original poster) »

Thank you for your replies, I'll try something cheaper, it should do the work

jpender
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Joined: 12 years ago

#8: Post by jpender »

yodil wrote:Yes it does, so if I understand, I could use a thermocouple, even if its not labeled as waterproof.
A thermocouple is simply two wires of different metals welded together at the end. You can't short circuit it because it's already shorted. The encapsulated waterproof versions are more about long term stability (eg corrosion resistance) or food safety.

Giampiero
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#9: Post by Giampiero »

As wrote above, the tip of the themocouple is "waterproof" but the cable not, so if you can't properly seal the part of the cable that is underpressure , maybe could leak until the connector attached to the Fluke, so be careful.
I speak by direct experience, and to avoid the water to reach the connector, i simply cut a section of the cable sheath just before the connector as in the photo.

bettysnephew
Posts: 658
Joined: 8 years ago

#10: Post by bettysnephew »

Type K thermocouples are very available. If you use a type K it is highly likely you will not need to do any compensation although it is not a bad idea to check. Is there a branch of McMaster -Carr, Grainger or similar business in Canada? Highly likely they would have a type K thermocouple. Thermoworks in USA also has a wide variety available.
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