Fluke 187 temperature probe - Page 2

Beginner and pro baristas share tips and tricks for making espresso.
yodil (original poster)
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Joined: 3 months ago

#11: Post by yodil (original poster) »

Thanks for your replies. I ordered this yesterday https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B01B7SE5J0?ref ... tails&th=1, I'm receiving it today, that's 35 CAD which is about 26 USD. It's a good idea to cut the sheath to avoid leaking in the multimeter. I think someone in this forum said to take the average temperature on the duration of the shot because it's an HX machine with a hump at the beginning of the temperature curve, I understand by this from pump on to pump off . There is no data logging feature on the Fluke 187 model so I'll have to just film the display and write down values or process the video with a computer. I think I have too much free time.


Pressino
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#12: Post by Pressino »

That TC should work great. BTW, congratulations on the 187, which is a superbly accurate and fast reading multimeter. Fluke stopped making over 15 years ago, but IMO it was the best handheld multimeter they made, better even than my 189 (whose logging function depends on a cap needs replacement every decade or so).

yodil (original poster)
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Joined: 3 months ago

#13: Post by yodil (original poster) »

Hi,

This is the output from my type K thermocouple with my Fluke 187 meter. It's 37 second shot on a NS Oscar 2 with a flush before the shot. I'm not sure of the response time of the thermocouple and it's accuracy. I did a boiling water calibration before. I put the thermocouple end inside the puck and not over the puck. I will later try a longer recovery time after the flush to get a higher temperarure.

AVG. 84.8 °C 184.6 °F


yodil (original poster)
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#14: Post by yodil (original poster) »

@Pressino, thanks for your reply

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cannonfodder
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#15: Post by cannonfodder »

I have a Fluke 187. Very good meter.

If you get the fluke TC adapter that plugs into the banana jacks, you can plug in any K type TC. They use a standard plug on the TC side.

If I am reading correctly, you are putting the TC atop an actual coffee puck and pulling a shot. Issue with that is you will be reading the coffee puck temperature not the water exiting the group.

Back before I had my Scace, I did something similar. Working on a shoestring budget, I took a single dose basket, put duct tape over the holes inside the basket, and poked one or two holes open with a sewing ping to give it some water flow to simulate a shot. Then got the TC in the basket (taped in) with a right angle so the probe was sticking straight up about 1/4 of an inch off the bottom of the basket. Then checked my temperatures. That got me the most accurate reading. You can also lay the TC over the lip of the basket with a bend to try to keep it elevated so you are not reading the basket temperature.
Dave Stephens

yodil (original poster)
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Joined: 3 months ago

#16: Post by yodil (original poster) »

cannonfodder wrote:cannonfodder

@cannonfodder, is that what you meant? The TC head is not clear because of the stars pattern on the duct tape.



jkoll42
Posts: 105
Joined: 14 years ago

#17: Post by jkoll42 »

jpender wrote:A thermocouple is simply two wires of different metals welded together at the end. You can't short circuit it because it's already shorted. The encapsulated waterproof versions are more about long term stability (eg corrosion resistance) or food safety.
Technically they don't have to even be welded. Just in solid contact. My TC wire I use from Omega for my roaster is just twisted and that's in direct contact with the rotating bean bed and have had it in there for years.

jkoll42
Posts: 105
Joined: 14 years ago

#18: Post by jkoll42 »

yodil wrote:Hi,

Does anyone have experience with Fluke temperature probes. I'm shopping online for one and the Fluke brand is pretty expensive and the shipping takes forever in Canada. Did anyone use a temperature probe besides Fluke that is compatible with the Fluke multimeter and that is almost as accurate. I want to put a probe over the puck while brewing as I read in another post on HB.

Thank you
I work in a Metrology lab so I deal with Fluke stuff all the time. Most of our calibration equipment for electrical is Fluke as well as most of our temperature.

That's a retired Fluke product but it will take ANY type K thermocouple. Bare wire, probe, whatever. In general the pricing of a TC correlates with how accurate it's going to be across the full range of temps. That being said even buying a Fluke TC requires a calibration lab certifying it if you are a ISO 9001 or 17025 or still running the old 570 standard.

Personally I would buy wire and the end hardware from Omega and make my own, but if not get a mid range price type K and don't get the braided ones. Get one with a nice sheathing (like the fluke one has). For general home use where you don't need multiple decimal place accuracy just put it in boiling water and note the reading, make a glass of ice water and let it sit until you have maybe a half inch of water without ice in the bottom and check that temp. Take the average of the two differences from 100 and 0C and manually adjust the offset on the meter to that number for general temperature.
If you are only reading temps closer/above 100 go with that offset number or vice versa for 0.