Dosing less than level with the rim of the basket - Page 3

Beginner and pro baristas share tips and tricks for making espresso.
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mrgnomer

#21: Post by mrgnomer »

I'm trying double tamping with double baskets, that is filling 1/2 way, light tamping and dosing with the remainder of a measured dose. The dose doesn't reach the top of the basket and to distribute I use a Stockfleths move using the ham of my thumb instead of the underside of my forefinger. I can get in there and distribute pretty evenly under the rim of the basket but the distributions are high on the edges, low in the middle. A Vivace convex Ergo Packer compensates well and the extractions are very good.
Kirk
LMWDP #116
professionals do it for the pay, amateurs do it for the love

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jesawdy

#22: Post by jesawdy »

Grant wrote:Distribute well, and then a careful spin of this inside the basket may level it nicely....sort of like a concrete spreader...
Grant's idea reminded me of an article I read about Paul Bassett, former WBC champ. He was using and/or working on developing a leveling tool that was somewhat shaped like a Nike "swoosh". The bottom curve side was graduated like a ruler at one end. Depending on where you place the curve and and twist to level the coffee, you can control the level of coffee below the basket rim.

For the life of me, I can't find this article again.. anyone recall seeing it? The article was mostly about how Paul has capitalized on his WBC win, his work in Japan, and only had a sidebar or photo of said leveling device. It was either in Freshcup, Barista Magazine or on-line.
Jeff Sawdy

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DC (original poster)

#23: Post by DC (original poster) »

Abe Carmeli wrote:use the WDT to fluff up the ground coffee and then level it without down pressure. That's the best way to down-dose. Alternatively, when leveling, bow your finger so that it will shave off more coffee. This will create a delay in saturating the center of your puck during extraction and it changes machine to machine, but it will allow you to down-dose.
Ok, I've been trying this for a few days now. I dose, WDT, level with a bowed finger and tamp (i've been switching between convex and flat tampers and haven't noticed much of a difference), and this gives me just the right head space. I've been using two blends and have noticed something which I was hoping one of you might explain for me.

With the first blend, a very fine grind is needed. However, the pour always goes haywire about 15 seconds in. It starts well, a nice cone develops with strong tiger striping and then all of a sudden the pour turns into a whirlwind and goes all over the place with spraying jets.

The second blend requires a much coarser grind to achieve about 60ml in 27 secs under the same conditions. However, despite the odd spray at the beginning, the pour remains good throughout. The pour develops nicely in the center and stays there.

Both blends are about 6 days post-roast. Why the difference?

Thanks again,

Dave

edit - I should also say the pucks looked ok afterwards: slight indentation from screw, no major holes or breaks.

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Martin
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#24: Post by Martin »

dsc wrote:Ola

I'm not sure if this could be helpful but I managed to create a small tool to distribute the coffee in my basket. I usually also dose less than the rim of the basket so I had trouble leveling the coffee, but not anymore. Behold the coffee stirring device:

Image

It's also good for breaking clumps, I use it instead of the single needle in my WDT ritual.

Cheers,
dsc.
I'm impressed. My more modest version has been to tape (pvc electrical) two very thin, coated florist wires to the not-brush end of my doser/grinder brush. I give a couple of seconds of stir and it seems to work nicely.
Martin

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Fullsack

#25: Post by Fullsack »

I'm getting fewer donuts with the Synesso single basket than I did with the stock Semi single basket. Switching from Schomer's NSEW to Stockfleth, also greatly reduced the dreaded donut extractions with the Elektra. After completing the Stockfleth, I scrape away some coffee, a 1/16th to 1/8th of an inch, from the lip of the basket and gently tap those loose grounds toward the center. It's all helping, it's progress, but still miles to go for consistent results.
LMWDP #017
Kill all my demons and my angels might die too. T. Williams

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luca
Team HB

#26: Post by luca »

jesawdy wrote:Grant's idea reminded me of an article I read about Paul Bassett, former WBC champ. He was using and/or working on developing a leveling tool that was somewhat shaped like a Nike "swoosh". The bottom curve side was graduated like a ruler at one end. Depending on where you place the curve and and twist to level the coffee, you can control the level of coffee below the basket rim.
Yeah, from memory PB's levelling device was shaped like an exponential curve. Clever. The next logical evolution was a much easier to use set of different curved plastic pieces. I suspect that a lot of people had the same idea, but credit goes to 2006 World Latte Art comp winner Scott Callaghan for actually making the set. (Don't know if he had PB's influence or not.) We have a set of Scotty's levelling tools at work. They're great for consistency between baristi and between baskets. Someone mentioned earlier in this thread that their single requires a lower dose than their double. This is exactly what we've found. We're using tool #6 for the double and the more curved #20 (from memory) for the single. I guess I should really take a photo at some stage.

Cheers,

Luca
LMWDP #034 | 2011: Q Exam, WBrC #3, Aus Cup Tasting #1 | Insta: @lucacoffeenotes

thejaneofalltrades

#27: Post by thejaneofalltrades »

dsc wrote:I'm not sure if this could be helpful but I managed to create a small tool to distribute the coffee in my basket. I usually also dose less than the rim of the basket so I had trouble leveling the coffee, but not anymore. Behold the coffee stirring device:

It's also good for breaking clumps, I use it instead of the single needle in my WDT ritual.

Cheers,
dsc.
Thanks for this great idea! I was wondering what you used to make yours. As an experiment, I made a similar one using a soda pop top, straight pins and a brad point bit to make the holes. It works great! Also going to get a tongue depresser and try making one of those other things for leveling inside the basket.

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dsc

#28: Post by dsc »

Hello

Glad someone finds this wierd looking tool useful:)

As for the materials, it's a round piece of plastic, a couple of pins and some styrofoam. Simple and quick to make. Works well.

I also made a curved leveling device, which matches the curve on my tamper. Still not sure how to level the grounds below the rim and remove all the unwanted coffee from the basket (when leveling with the rim you just slide it off).

Cheers,
dsc.

thejaneofalltrades

#29: Post by thejaneofalltrades »

Also was wondering how far apart you placed your pins. My first attempt they were definitely too close together to do anything but make a mess!

gscace

#30: Post by gscace »

Hi:

The really easiest way to do this is to go to the sh**ty carparts store of your choice, perhaps operated by Manny, Moe, and Jack, and buy one of those cheesy fiberglass body repair kits with the red plastic squeegies in them. When you get home, throw away everything except the squeegies. Take a plate or something circular and trace a radius against the bottom edge of the squeegie (smiley face up for underdosing). Cut the radius with a kitchen shears and you now have an underdosing tool that is really reliable and does a waaay better dosing job than any crooked finger anywhere. It's simple as dirt and it WORKS. Make different ones with different curves for different amounts of underdosing.

-Greg