Clumpy crema - Page 2

Beginner and pro baristas share tips and tricks for making espresso.
Pressino

#11: Post by Pressino »

OK, those dark flecks can indicate that the extraction water was too hot. Other contributing causes are grinding too fine or over-tamping. The bubbles consist mostly of CO2, and can come from beans that haven't sufficiently out gassed after roasting.

kris772
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#12: Post by kris772 »

I still say fresh oily beans 5 days ago... I don't think anyone has done a progression of pictures showing result as beans age. (no fair if you freeze them.)
Life is too short for bad espresso! - Thunk-ed, NOT stirred!

espressomonkey (original poster)

#13: Post by espressomonkey (original poster) »

UPDATE: I think my beans were too fresh. Just pulled a beautiful shot (no clumpy crema) and poured some great latte art :D

espressomonkey (original poster)

#14: Post by espressomonkey (original poster) »

Pressino wrote:OK, those dark flecks can indicate that the extraction water was too hot. Other contributing causes are grinding too fine or over-tamping. The bubbles consist mostly of CO2, and can come from beans that haven't sufficiently out gassed after roasting.
Interesting thought about the extraction water being to hot. I did just start running a "heat exchanger cool down flush" before my shots. This could have contributed to my successful shot.

So in summary the only things that changed were:
  • Beans outgassed a few more days
  • Started doing a "Heat exchange cool down flush" see: /hx-love.html
And I'm now making the best lattes! thanks everyone 8)

kris772
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#15: Post by kris772 »

espressomonkey wrote:UPDATE: I think my beans were too fresh. Just pulled a beautiful shot (no clumpy crema) and poured some great latte art :D
see, I think those beans were great - I love that stuff!!! :)
Life is too short for bad espresso! - Thunk-ed, NOT stirred!

kris772
Supporter ♡

#16: Post by kris772 »

espressomonkey wrote:Interesting thought about the extraction water being to hot. I did just start running a "heat exchanger cool down flush" before my shots. This could have contributed to my successful shot.

So in summary the only things that changed were:
  • Beans outgassed a few more days
  • Started doing a "Heat exchange cool down flush" see: /hx-love.html
And I'm now making the best lattes! thanks everyone 8)
When I come to my Livia, assuming it is warmed up (anything after 35 min), I flush until steam is gone (~3-5 secs) and then another 3 seconds or so(to lower the water temp at the head), then immediately lock and load and start pre-infusion (3 secs pump on, 6 sec pump off) and then pump on for regular pull.
Do you do it differently on your Livia?
Life is too short for bad espresso! - Thunk-ed, NOT stirred!

espressomonkey (original poster)

#17: Post by espressomonkey (original poster) » replying to kris772 »

Interesting my process is:
  • Warm up for 30-1 hour (I use a smart outlet to turn it on everyday before I wake up)
  • Flush steam for a few seconds
  • Flush group head for 10ish seconds
  • immediately pull shot
  • Start steaming right after espresso is done
I don't do any pre-infusion. Does the pre-infusion work well for you?

kris772
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#18: Post by kris772 » replying to espressomonkey »

I am surprised you are not getting sour shots but if it works for you, keep doing it!!!!!

I have not done a good pre-infusion or non- test. I do notice that my grind would be much different if I did not do pre-infusion - that is, when the puck soaks up water, the pull is much slower. Without PI I would have to grind tighter. I figure that if machines like the Lelit Elizabeth (which I lust after) use it automaticaly, if selected, I figure it must be a good thing, so I do it.
Life is too short for bad espresso! - Thunk-ed, NOT stirred!

espressomonkey (original poster)

#19: Post by espressomonkey (original poster) »

I'm going to try pre infusion this week. Just assumed it wasn't possible on the livia 90. Any other pasquini tips you have?

kris772
Supporter ♡

#20: Post by kris772 » replying to espressomonkey »

PI on the Livia simply means (to me!) turning on your pump for 3 seconds, shutting it off and then waiting 6 seconds and then turning pump on again for the pull. (I have not experimented with different timings) It is a crude PI compared to the steam boiler assist that the Elizabeth does, but I believe it is all that machines like Breville (and many others) advertise and use, so I thought I'd try it. I stop at 3 seconds simply because on most beans I get nothing or maybe a drop or 2.(I don't want to start extraction here.) Then when I turn the pump on again, I "time" from first real drip (which might be 6 seconds later - depends on bean and grind.

I do not play a lot with grind other than to find a setting where I get a slowish pull and then note that for that bean so I remember (I have 3 different beans in freezer now that I rotate - set grinder for that bean, grind and go.I do not thaw the beans.)

I do not play a lot with dose weight and mostly use 17.4g at the moment as that seems to work fine in a common ridged basket for all of these beans. I did briefly play with 21.4 in a triple bottomless but have backed off from that as I was getting better taste with this.

I do not play much with temperature since with this machine it is kind of a scatter-gun whereas something like the Elizabeth is an electron microscope. But is seems fairly easy (using the introductory flush and then immediate pull) to get a good tasty shot and I am pleased with it.

I have had this Livia less than a month so you are as likely to have tips for me, as I for you!!!. Fun machine! Gentle beastie! Built like a tank! Love it!

btw my pressure peaks at about 1.2 - where does yours peak?
Life is too short for bad espresso! - Thunk-ed, NOT stirred!