Blind shaker better than WDT?? - Page 32

Beginner and pro baristas share tips and tricks for making espresso.
d3rw1n
Posts: 40
Joined: 1 year ago

#311: Post by d3rw1n »

Jonk wrote:I need more time to play with it, but this is my suggestion for others to try: Skip the shake and just use the tumbler/shaker to form a center mound before tamping to isolate the differences. Perhaps this is how deep WDT "undo" the supposed benefits of shaking when used in combination with an unevenly extracting basket..
I got distracted once and forgot to shake. Still got a nice center mound distribution from the blind shaker so I went ahead with only a surface rake to level then tamp. Bottomless pour was a mess & looked so uneven. Shot time was longer and taste wasn't good. IMHO deep WDT could potentially undo the good enough center mound distribution from the blind shaker, not the benefits of shaking. Considering how fines tend to stick to whatever surface they come into contact with, once they're stuck to the larger particles (if they truly become integrated after shaking as some theorised) I don't think it can simply be undone with WDT.
Maak wrote:As to why the HE basket doesnt work for me. I dont like the results I get with paper filters. Although there are some positives, for me, It takes away from the viscosity and richness.
The idea of a basket that doesnt flex is great, the idea of a basket with the whole bottom used and straight sides makes sense even if its impossible to tap grounds out after.
Sorry for going off topic here. I also feel I'm sacrificing the viscosity and richness of my shots for the sake of cleanliness. Without bottom paper filters I never like the accumulated fines on the tamping mat (from vertical tapping). Poking the clogged holes of the Pesado HE basket with 0.25mm needle also got a bit too much for me after a while. As for knocking the puck out I have a good solution that works great for my setup. I happen to have a bellow that fits perfectly for my bottomless portafilter. One smack on the bellow works like a charm every time (providing you don't let the puck sit for too long after your shot). Also works without bottom paper filter as well as on standard baskets. Puck knocks out cleanly in one piece without all the noisy banging.



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Maak
Posts: 125
Joined: 4 years ago

#312: Post by Maak »

That's an awesome idea to remove the puck from the HE. And yes cleaning those holes is a pain... although if you shake you get less grounds stuck in them. So the idea that once the fines are integrated into larger grounds, they stay there, is also implied here.

kye
Posts: 152
Joined: 3 years ago

#313: Post by kye »

I tried shaking using my dosing cup instead of the blind shaker and noticed that the grounds seem to cake into a lump and just 'plop' back and forth from one side to the other, and it was quite difficult to get them to tumble by shaking in a circle. The blind shaker has the pillar in the middle which would break up the lump any time it went straight from one side to the other, so I suspect that with the same shaking motion it probably does a better job.
I only tried it once, so take this as an observation and theory rather than conclusion.

d3rw1n
Posts: 40
Joined: 1 year ago

#314: Post by d3rw1n replying to kye »

When I started I only had the tall stainless catch cup from my grinder. I found shaking side to side or in a circular motion on the horizontal plane was not effective enough to mix the grounds (still ended up with spritzers and messy pours). I settled with tilting the cup slightly and doing a circular motion on the vertical plane to let gravity help while hitting the side of the cup with my other hand. More like allowing the cup to keep hitting the palm of my other hand as I do the movement. The constant hitting loosens the grounds that tend to stick to the wall and base of the cup. The height of the cup helps prevent grounds from flying out. With a large tall cup you can really see the grounds tumbling inside. With a regular dosing cup it's much more difficult doing it without making a mess so a lid is kind of required. With a lid on you can do the same movement without spilling. Or any movement however you wish basically as long as the grounds get tumbled which always involves some vertical movement.

BaristaBob
Posts: 1873
Joined: 6 years ago

#315: Post by BaristaBob »

With regards to grounds clinging to all parts of the blind shaker (I have the Craig Lyn version), last night I blew the parts down in the sink with compressed air, followed by a tissue. As something new to try to mitigate the static cling of fines, I took a microfiber cloth to all the parts. This morning using it twice, I observed way less coffee fines clinging to the blind shaker. Not sure how long this "treatment" will last, but even wiping it down each day with a microfiber cloth, after my last coffee, wouldn't be so bad. Time will tell.
Bob "hello darkness my old friend..I've come to drink you once again"

Capuchin Monk
Posts: 1277
Joined: 15 years ago

#316: Post by Capuchin Monk »

It's the coffee oil residue on the surface. I use paper towel and some rubbing alcohol to wipe the inside face of my aluminum dosing cup that came with my grinder. It slides grinds well for a few days. So I use this cleaning method every 4 - 5 days.

h3yn0w
Posts: 476
Joined: 13 years ago

#317: Post by h3yn0w »

I don't own a refractometer so this is very anecdotal, but ever since the blind shaker video I've been experimenting with very vigorous WDT. I don't just mean deep WDT , I mean really whisking things hard and trying to elicit some form of vertical mixing and hopefully densification. A funnel is definitely a must for this.

When I do this , my shots do in fact run faster so something is changing vs my regular wdt. I would love for someone else to try this and report back.

sympa
Posts: 135
Joined: 1 year ago

#318: Post by sympa »

BaristaBob wrote:With regards to grounds clinging to all parts of the blind shaker (I have the Craig Lyn version), last night I blew the parts down in the sink with compressed air, followed by a tissue. As something new to try to mitigate the static cling of fines, I took a microfiber cloth to all the parts. This morning using it twice, I observed way less coffee fines clinging to the blind shaker. Not sure how long this "treatment" will last, but even wiping it down each day with a microfiber cloth, after my last coffee, wouldn't be so bad. Time will tell.
What do you think the microfiber is doing to cause this?

BaristaBob
Posts: 1873
Joined: 6 years ago

#319: Post by BaristaBob replying to sympa »

Well I'm really not sure. I thought the microfiber might reduce static charge inside the blind shake, but it's probably just removing coffee oils.
Bob "hello darkness my old friend..I've come to drink you once again"

d3rw1n
Posts: 40
Joined: 1 year ago

#320: Post by d3rw1n »

h3yn0w wrote:I don't own a refractometer so this is very anecdotal, but ever since the blind shaker video I've been experimenting with very vigorous WDT. I don't just mean deep WDT , I mean really whisking things hard and trying to elicit some form of vertical mixing and hopefully densification. A funnel is definitely a must for this.

When I do this , my shots do in fact run faster so something is changing vs my regular wdt. I would love for someone else to try this and report back.
Someone here also mentioned stirring gives the same effect as shaking. Over the years I've been changing the tools used for mixing/homogenising and distributing so I had tried what you've been experimenting with. You can grind directly into the portafilter doing it that way.

I found the effectiveness depends on the tool being used and how vigorous your mixing is. No matter how vigorous I was 0.25mm needles just couldn't get the job done. 0.3mm needles did a better job but still wasn't good enough for the grounds from my conical grinder. I found the Londinium type WDT tool that came with that grinder (with loop ends and thicker prongs) was more effective for mixing but not great for distributing after. If you just want to use one tool I'm guessing a WDT tool with slightly thicker needles like the Levercraft tool (0.4mm) could give you the best of both worlds.