Best way to make a "big" cup of coffee with an espresso machine - Page 2

Beginner and pro baristas share tips and tricks for making espresso.
ojt

#11: Post by ojt »

GDM528 wrote: 5) For a bit of extra flavor, and a lot of extra mouthfeel, dump the spent puck into your cup. Prudent to wait a bit before drinking.
:D

And extra kick to wake up!
Osku

baldheadracing
Team HB

#12: Post by baldheadracing »

AVoss wrote:... Sage Bambino Plus ... Sage Smart Grinder Pro. ...

What is the best way to make a nice cup of coffee with our equipment?
I'd suggest staying with the stock pressurized portafilter basket to keep the flow through the machine's thermoblock under control. Let the machine run until you reach the 120ml volume that you want. Keep the mass of grinds constant and gradually try finer and finer grind settings until the taste falls into bitterness. Then go back a little coarser on the grind setting.

Good luck!
-"Good quality brings happiness as you use it" - Nobuho Miya, Kamasada

AVoss (original poster)

#13: Post by AVoss (original poster) »

"I'd suggest staying with the stock pressurized portafilter basket to keep the flow through the machine's thermoblock under control."
I extra ordered single wall baskets and a bottomless portafilter because I thought this gives more control over the flow. This is wrong?

baldheadracing
Team HB

#14: Post by baldheadracing »

AVoss wrote:I extra ordered single wall baskets and a bottomless portafilter because I thought this gives more control over the flow. This is wrong?
You're not wrong - for espresso. That implies pulling a normal espresso volume and adding water to get to 120ml (Americano). That's one option.

The other option is to pull the full 120ml volume through the grounds. Please keep in mind that this is asking the machine to do something that is essentially the exact opposite of what it was designed to do. Using a single-wall basket in this situation will just make things worse. Why?

The reason is you only have indirect control over flow. Flow is the result; an output. Once you grind, dose, tamp, and turn on the brew switch - you're done. However, the puck's resistance lowers as extraction time passes. More stuff in the puck gets dissolved and goes into your coffee. This loss of stuff over time results in the puck having less mass, less structure, and less resistance - so flow increases as time passes and you can't do anything about it with a single-wall. You will get what is known as a "back-end blow-out" and you might well end up with a sour-tasting coffee.

With the pressurized basket, flow is physically limited throughout the very long shot. It is impossible to have a back-end blow-out.

In addition, in a typical thermoblock machine, flow and brew temperature are correlated. The faster the flow, the lower the brew water temperature, especially after the thermoblock's capacity has been exceeded. (The thermoblock is sized for espresso volumes, not the many times greater volume that you want.)

Regardless, I would suggest trying the two options, and the single-wall and pressurized baskets. Whatever method tastes best to you is best.
-"Good quality brings happiness as you use it" - Nobuho Miya, Kamasada

henri

#15: Post by henri »

Nunas wrote:The other is the Sprover (short for espresso pour over); To make one, you grind coarse enough that you don't generate more than about 1.5 bar of pressure, and the pull lasts about fifty seconds, giving a ratio of about 1:12.
I believe this is what here in (southern) Germany and Switzerland is called a "caffè crema". It's so popular that large commercial ("second-wave") roasters even produce specific blends for it.

(Since I assume OP speaks German, I suggest looking up more information using this keyword on German-speaking websites.)

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cafeIKE
Supporter ❤

#16: Post by cafeIKE »

If making Americano, pull the shot into the hot water ≈170°F

AVoss (original poster)

#17: Post by AVoss (original poster) »

Indeed I am German and basically want to drink "Café Crème" or "Caffè Crema" or "Schümli". It comes form Switzerland where they are used to big cups from fully automated coffe machines for decades now whereas the German pendant is the "Filterkaffee" pour over or what you want to call it.
So far I found a wide range od recipes for it. With our espresso machine I usually take between 12 and 16g ground relatively fine with roughly a 10:1 ratio. Time is roughly 30 seconds. Of course you cannot influence the pressure of the cheap machines. I think most of them are roughly in the 9 bar range.

DamianWarS
Supporter ♡

#18: Post by DamianWarS »

AVoss wrote:We grind relatively fine, between 5 and 15 on the Sage grinder, level with a tool and tamp with an automatic tamper and the shot time is some 30 seconds for 110ml at the moment.)
If a Café Crème is the goal this sounds about right. The important thing is do you like the results? If not, how would you describe what is lacking?

AVoss (original poster)

#19: Post by AVoss (original poster) »

What is lacking? Of course the perfect taste!
And this depends far more on the beans than on the coffee making equipment. The good thing with non-pod-machines is that you are not restricted to the coffee that the machine company has chosen for you. We have a nice lokal grinder around the corner (and many many more in the posh quarters of town) and still are drinking through its palette.

jpender

#20: Post by jpender »

AVoss wrote:Indeed I am German and basically want to drink "Café Crème" or "Caffè Crema" or "Schümli". It comes form Switzerland where they are used to big cups from fully automated coffe machines for decades now whereas the German pendant is the "Filterkaffee" pour over or what you want to call it.
I was staying at hotel in Basel and the coffee they served in the hotel breakfast room was wonderful. It had a very rich body, not really like filter coffee I've had elsewhere. They delivered it to the table in a carafe. I've always wondered how they made that coffee. I took a small vial home and measured it's strength to be 1.8%.