The $2.50 WDT tool - revisited - let's see yours - Page 3

Beginner and pro baristas share tips and tricks.
Tonefish

Postby Tonefish » Aug 08, 2018, 3:38 pm

DaveB wrote:A Fortaleza stopper would take it to a whole new level, with the bonus of getting a superior tequila for slightly more money. 8)

I don't know how I missed this but, YES, that is an awesome stopper and a great story (the only true Suaza left). Had I not been already on the way with ordering Jonathan's (Moxiechef) looped wire shafts and knobs like MAtt's (MB) only wooden, I'd give this a try. Although, that won't stop me from giving the Fortaleza a try either! :wink: Cheers!!

I think by the time I have this all finished I'll have spent what the Londinium tool cost, but wouldn't have had nearly as much fun.

I had looked into the Londinium tool before all of this and it wasn't as much the tool cost but the shipping that turned me away. I need 3 of them too for office and camper, so it'll pay off in the long run. More to come ..... Cheers!!
LMWDP #581 .......... May your roasts, grinds, and pulls be the best!

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slipchuck

Postby slipchuck » Aug 09, 2018, 1:58 pm

Bret wrote:I recently got the Londinium distribution tool, and it really is effective. I had tried toothpicks, skewers, etc., and then the tool provided with my Monolith (a single metal pin, no sharp point). The tool that came with the Monolith was sort of 'randomly effective' in the sense that I could tell things were better using it than not, but it was not consistent.

So I sprung for the Londinium puppy, and it is extremely consistent and more effective than any other approach I have tried. In every case, the drops form evenly, simultaneously across the bottomless portafilter/basket.

One thing that may not be apparent by just looking at photos of the tool is that the wires are thin and flex quite a bit as you stir. So when creating one's own version of the tool, rigid wire stock might not yield the same results. Or it might. But if you are trying to 'clone' a version of the tool, thin wire stock that flexes in use would be a better starting point.

In terms of value for the buck, though, I would say that the Londinium tool is a surprisingly good value in case folks are not inclined to make their own tool. I would say it and the LevTamp are two of the three best purchase I have made in the last few years, the other being the Monolith Flat. So for around forty bucks, the Londinium puppy is worthwhile.

Piano wire is flexible and easy available in different diameters. I could be wrong but I think they are made of stainless steel



Randy
“There is nobody you can’t learn to like once you’ve heard their story.”

Tonefish

Postby Tonefish » Aug 10, 2018, 7:23 pm

Latest proto: Tone's Space Needle Experience Tribute WDT Tool.
knob $0.50, wire $1.25, stain and glue - pennies.
Notes: I tried the smallest available 0.024" wire too and being stainless (I'd guess a 300 series) it bends far too easy.
Even for the fatter wire at 0.041" the drill bits are so small they are easily swayed by the grain in the wood.
Works great though!!
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Cheers!!
LMWDP #581 .......... May your roasts, grinds, and pulls be the best!

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guijan12

Postby guijan12 » Aug 11, 2018, 4:37 am

Not as beautifull as some others, but still working well.
I found out 3 wires is the maximum needed for my set.

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Moxiechef

Postby Moxiechef » Aug 11, 2018, 8:05 am

Tonefish wrote:Latest proto: Tone's Space Needle Experience Tribute WDT Tool.
knob $0.50, wire $1.25, stain and glue - pennies.
Notes: I tried the smallest available 0.024" wire too and being stainless (I'd guess a 300 series) it bends far too easy.
Even for the fatter wire at 0.041" the drill bits are so small they are easily swayed by the grain in the wood.
Works great though!!
<image>
Cheers!!


Looks pretty good!!

Tonefish

Postby Tonefish » Aug 12, 2018, 7:44 pm

guijan12 wrote:Not as beautifull as some others, but still working well.
I found out 3 wires is the maximum needed for my set.

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I like the copper. Probably soft enough to try different leg angles. I like the idea of trying different configurations, which it looks like you can easily do with that setup. I've made 3 and 4 legged versions to see which one I gravitate towards. Cheers!
LMWDP #581 .......... May your roasts, grinds, and pulls be the best!

Tonefish

Postby Tonefish » Aug 12, 2018, 7:47 pm

Moxiechef wrote:Looks pretty good!!

Thanks ... I really like those loops and don't think I'd have ever come across them! Cheers!!
LMWDP #581 .......... May your roasts, grinds, and pulls be the best!

danhealy

Postby danhealy » Aug 14, 2018, 4:47 pm

Tonefish wrote:After thinking about this a bit, that approach seems to be more focused on creating an even distribution of channel paths versus the typical WDT focus on homogeneity of the grounds. I saw that tool in one of his presentation, video blog type things ... or maybe it was a class ....

So does he do WDT first, then doze it, then channel it with the tool in the video, and finally tamp? Seems that would make a series of slightly weaker paths in an attempt to force more even distribution. IF that is true then it may facilitate a finer grind too, but then you'd want more paths ... etc. I wonder if he is judging purely on taste or if he's measuring extraction, or other parameters?


Yes I think you have the order correct. He said that sometimes he does a hand tap to settle the grinds again afterwards, but not always. He also said his goal is to get "a faster, higher yield extraction OR a finer extraction without losing yield." I would love to try this thing. It's been almost a year since he posted this, I wonder if there's been any progress.

Tonefish

Postby Tonefish » Aug 14, 2018, 7:46 pm

Tried the different leg configurations over the last few days and I'm liking the 6 legged creatures best. It is very efficient. Here's the whole fam damily. Next, I'll be trying to work with the finer wire. Cheers!!
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LMWDP #581 .......... May your roasts, grinds, and pulls be the best!

IPW20X

Postby IPW20X » Aug 14, 2018, 8:07 pm

Matcha tea whisk with most of the legs cut off.....soft bamboo is easy on my precision baskets.

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