What is the latest on the storage of coffee greens? - Page 6

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
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networkcrasher

#51: Post by networkcrasher »

Damn. So sealed storage (airtight "Tupperware" style container) in a wine cellar at 57* and 60%RH won't work? Looks like a lot of folks might get coffee for an extra Christmas surprise this year!

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Compass Coffee
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#52: Post by Compass Coffee »

Damn. So sealed storage (airtight "Tupperware" style container) in a wine cellar at 57* and 60%RH won't work? Looks like a lot of folks might get coffee for an extra Christmas surprise this year!
Not saying that at all. First most people don't have close to that level of controlled environment greens storage. Second while it works quite well it won't keep greens as fresh as long as vacuum sealed and frozen. For normal annual crop greens rotation likely quite adequate, if not optimal.
Mike McGinness, Head Bean (Owner/Roast Master)
http://www.CompassCoffeeRoasting.com

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networkcrasher

#53: Post by networkcrasher »

Interesting, but now I have to pose another question (even after reading the thread). Would vaccuum sealing make an appreciable impact verses storage in an airtight container? Well, it's reasonably airtight - the lid has a gasket as shown below:


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farmroast

#54: Post by farmroast »

You can use a Foodsaver with vacuum bags or get the canning jar attachment.
farm
LMWDP #167 "with coffee we create with wine we celebrate"

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farmroast

#55: Post by farmroast »

I also found a dead freezer works well for just keeping a basic stable environment.
farm
LMWDP #167 "with coffee we create with wine we celebrate"

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networkcrasher

#56: Post by networkcrasher »

Thanks, but I was more considering the response to whether the vacuum makes a difference or if the seal does. I understand the residual air/oxygen in the container would cause issue, but after time, in a sealed environment, would the impact be negligible after the residual gas makes its impact?

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Compass Coffee
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#57: Post by Compass Coffee »

Thanks, but I was more considering the response to whether the vacuum makes a difference or if the seal does. I understand the residual air/oxygen in the container would cause issue, but after time, in a sealed environment, would the impact be negligible after the residual gas makes its impact?
You answered your own question. If residual air/oxygen causes an issue, then evacuating more air/oxygen via vacuum would obviously make a difference. Irrelevant if after time in sealed environment no further damage would be done from no additional air/oxygen.

That said I have not done comparisons vac' freezing greens versus simple sealed container freezing greens. I had a FoodSaver before I started home roasting 8 years ago so always vac.

Vac'd frozen versus vac'd room temp does make a definite difference long term storage. The longer the storage, the greater the difference.
Mike McGinness, Head Bean (Owner/Roast Master)
http://www.CompassCoffeeRoasting.com

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networkcrasher

#58: Post by networkcrasher »

This is a good thread.. thanks for the words.

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cannonfodder (original poster)
Team HB

#59: Post by cannonfodder (original poster) »

I have been vac packing and deep freezing my greens for a while now, works very good for me.
Dave Stephens

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GC7
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#60: Post by GC7 »

Here is what I do with some of my storage.


Foodsaver bags in vacuum at 56-57*F

Wine and Coffee - Yum!