Sweet Maria's roast profile summary

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
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RAS

#1: Post by RAS »

Just received a shipment from Sweet Maria's, and inside the box was one of Tom's postcards about coffee. Typically these are pictures of some coffee plants or a plantation, etc. This time was different, and something I think all of us roasters can appreciate. Probably the best "degree of roast" summary I've ever seen. I hope Tom doesn't mind me sharing this great piece of information. PM me if you'd like the actual files I've uploaded for better printing.



Bob

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[creative nickname]

#2: Post by [creative nickname] »

They are nice materials, but it is worth mentioning that temperature guidelines should always be treated with caution, as these measurements can vary quite a bit depending on your equipment and instrumentation set-up. Sensory guidelines are much easier to compare across equipment.
LMWDP #435

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HB
Admin

#3: Post by HB »

RAS wrote:I hope Tom doesn't mind me sharing this great piece of information.
Do you have a page on Sweet Maria's website or a newsletter link? Or you can ask Tom if he minds this being uploaded to HB as generally speaking, most sites copyright their images and won't allow republication without permission. Otherwise we'll have to remove the images in your post.

UPDATE: Thanks to Sweet Maria's for permission to include the cards in this thread. See below.
Thanks for the note. Yep, that's cool with us, as long as credit is given, but it should be fine since our name is on the front! We've been working hard on the new cards so I'm glad to hear you liked it! The Cabrejo is a classic! Let us know if you ever need anything.
Best,
Tim

"Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting - Tom & Maria
https://www.sweetmarias.com
Dan Kehn

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SlowRain

#4: Post by SlowRain »

Thanks, Tom! This is another great resource to add to the arsenal. Thanks, RAS, for bringing this to our attention.

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FotonDrv

#5: Post by FotonDrv »

I have enjoyed Sweet Maria's info that they provide and usually eagerly await their offerings.

Thanks for the Posting!
That Light at the End of the Tunnel is actually a train

BarryR

#6: Post by BarryR »

fonaPam wrote:Thanks for the post. That's a good guide though it is a little difficult to follow exactly. I wonder about the length of time for roasting?
The length will vary greatly depending on roaster and technique and the variability from one roaster to another (or even one profile to another) will be greater than the difference in roasting to a different levels following one profile.

In other words, the difference between City & City+ is roughly 45 secs or so and maybe similar from City+ to FC.
I can easily create that much difference without changing the roast level by slowing down the roast.

Hope this is coherent.

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Martin

#7: Post by Martin »

[creative nickname] wrote: worth mentioning that temperature guidelines should always be treated with caution, as these measurements can vary quite a bit depending on your equipment and instrumentation set-up. Sensory guidelines are much easier to compare across equipment.
I'd add that home roasters, roasting for their own consumption of 3-5-maybe a couple more espresso shots per day are dealing with even more than temp measurement variables including changing crops, length of rest, smaller purchases to take advantage of greater variety, and so on. Also, smaller batches mean time and temp targets are more critical/difficult.

Experiencing SM's 5 sensory parameters (excellent contribution) is rarely mentioned as a primary consideration in the selection or design of home roasters, which seems to me a major deficit of much of the work reported on here. Does your 1 lb or 1k roaster allow you optimally to see, hear, or smell the roast in real time? So, I continue to look for a roaster to buy that enhances rather than hides sensory experience. Until then I'm stuck with my heatgun, which, I'm supposing (after 10+ years) compares favorably with more complex machines.