Sweet Marias *Popper - Page 5

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
jpender
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#41: Post by jpender »

another_jim wrote:I use the combo of ammeter and ET to set the power on my Quest; that may be coloring my judgment.
Those are beautiful roasters.

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drgary
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#42: Post by drgary »

baldheadracing wrote:It can do everything for you, but it doesn't have to. Thus, you can get reasonable results immediately, and then dive as deep as you want to. Their business model is predicated on subscription; the machinery itself is quite excellent for the price. However, look at the threads here, and, if you can mount a thermocouple, then you can say good-bye to ever needing a subscription and their roast curves that they have developed for each of their subscription coffees. That's why I'd say that it is a "sweet spot."

BTW, your proportions don't seem that out of proportion to me. If I exclude my 'collection,' and look at current retail prices, then I would have paid about $10k for the main roaster with ancillaries, $3k for the grinder, and $2k for the espresso machine. However, I didn't pay anywhere near those numbers because almost everything was purchased used and needing repair.

That being said, I don't save money roasting, although it is certainly possible to save money roasting.
You don't need to mount a thermocouple to be able to adapt roasts to your own greens on the IKAWA Home, although there's great documentation in threads here on how to do so, also threads on adding a humidity tester to detect first crack, and a spreadsheet for developing your own profiles. I especially appreciate experimentation done by GDM528 and esteve to engineer all of this fine tuning. In the review I also show how to use the provided and subscription software versions to adjust roasts to your taste.

I really like the automation, too, since roasts very consistently follow the programmed profile. The consistency is related to its running on inlet temperature.

And, I wouldn't underestimate the learning curve of driving roasts manually, even with lots of measurement ability and Artisan software.
Gary
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What I WOULD do for a good cup of coffee!

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baldheadracing
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#43: Post by baldheadracing »

drgary wrote:You don't need to mount a thermocouple to be able to adapt roasts to your own greens on the IKAWA Home,
True, but I was thinking that a thermocouple would make the process easier for a beginner once they "got into it."
drgary wrote: And, I wouldn't underestimate the learning curve of driving roasts manually, even with lots of measurement ability and Artisan software.
That's the big advantage of the Ikawa - one can get pretty decent roasts right away just by going into their library and grabbing one of their profiles for a similar bean and running that profile. Then one can experiment from there.

There is always the learning curve, but with the Ikawa's library as a starting point, there shouldn't be many, if any, roasts going into the composter on the way :D.
-"Good quality brings happiness as you use it" - Nobuho Miya, Kamasada

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drgary
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#44: Post by drgary »

For jpender, yes, installing a thermocouple would be a good idea. For others, it could be a distraction from using your senses to sniff the exhaust and determine drop time - I like to set the programmed drop time a bit longer than necessary so that I can start the cooling cycle by smell. The installed profile itself gives you a good temperature measurement.

I apologize that we are getting distracted from the Sweet Maria's Popper and promise to let the thread get back on that track. If more is written about the IKAWA, Craig or I can split that discussion into another topic.
Gary
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jpender
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#45: Post by jpender »

drgary wrote:For jpender, yes, installing a thermocouple would be a good idea. For others, it could be a distraction from using your senses to sniff the exhaust and determine drop time...
What does that mean? Is this like measuring the weight of an espresso shot versus looking to see when it blondes? I can't speak for anyone else but I want to do both.

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drgary
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#46: Post by drgary »

Answered via DM.
Gary
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pcofftenyo
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#47: Post by pcofftenyo »

More poo for the parade, unfortunately.

I purchased one of these a couple years ago for sample roasting as its a challenge for me in the Huky (probe placement). 50 g roasting in my Bullet is even less successful. It died, dead, recently. Fan wouldn't spin then would spin/stop. I dissambled, cleaned,
(it was really clean inside but I still worked over the hub), re-assembled. It would start okay but then fail.

Roasting consisted of manual monitoring on a notepad. Didn't use Artisan as that would have resulted in some additional complexity I didn't want to undertake.

I first added a wattmeter to get some insight into how much power I was adding or subtracting. The temp dial on mine was NOT linear as a slight turn from say 12 to 1 resulted in a significant increase in power, but the change from 1 to 3 was negligible.

I added a TC too.

I roasted several batches over a few months early with a cool down equal to the roast duration, but then quit using it except for a batch or two once a month. I honestly don't think I had 200 roasts in it.

Generously, maybe 10%-20% of my roasts were okay, but that's it.

It got to yellow really quickly which I could modulate, but I never could get Malliard and FC-drop right. When I tried to slow yellow I had problems during Malliard (either stall or ramp too fast) leading to problems during Crack. Roasts were either grassy/underdeveloped or scorched/ raw (too much outside, not enough inside).

While advertised as 100g I could only successfully roast about 60g with adequate initial agitation. Any more volume than that resulted in dramatic differences in beans ( IE some clearly yellow with others far behind). This was more pronounced with washed, grade 1 estate coffees with very high processing quality where I figured it would be pronounced with Gr3 community lots.

Despite following a working roast for a particular bean, I never got the same results. Even with similar roasting environment temps/humidity.

Disappointed. Even for the money I was hoping for more durability.

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baldheadracing
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#48: Post by baldheadracing »

FYI, from IG:
Sweet Maria's wrote:We know how beloved basic popcorn poppers are for DIY coffee roasting. If that sentiment applies to you, something exciting just landed in our warehouse. Poppo is a low-cost electric air popcorn popper that can be transformed into a DIY coffee roaster when paired with the Poppo Coffee Roasting Sleeve. Keep an eye out for more details soon!
-"Good quality brings happiness as you use it" - Nobuho Miya, Kamasada

jpender
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#49: Post by jpender »

The Poppo kit is available now. I wonder if this is what the Popper V2 turned into.

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baldheadracing
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#50: Post by baldheadracing »

Dunno. Popper couldn't roast dark, due to UL appliance standards (viz. Nesco recall). Poppo is $28.50.
-"Good quality brings happiness as you use it" - Nobuho Miya, Kamasada