Storing 25-50 kg coffee greens - Page 2

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
BodieZoffa

#11: Post by BodieZoffa »

warlock wrote:Oh interesting, would you be comfortable describing the original bags the coffee is stored in? Also is it to much to ask for a pic?? Thanks
Basically I'm fine with what bags it arrives in from Sweet Maria's, Coffee Bean Corral, etc. Sweet Maria's says if you're comfortable in an area the green should be as well and to let it breathe somewhat. Certainly works for me... Will post a pic once I have a minute...

warlock (original poster)

#12: Post by warlock (original poster) » replying to BodieZoffa »

Thanks sooo much thatoukd be really helpful!!! :D

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CarefreeBuzzBuzz

#13: Post by CarefreeBuzzBuzz »

warlock wrote: No, not the moment. But would you recommend a particular one ??
No but if you want to keep them fresh that is the way to go. Figure out what is available where you are and pack them in sizes that you can use within a month or two of opening.

Anything else will let oxygen in. Keep them cool and in stable humidity and you will be fine.

The Ecotat bags that are sold are hard to reseal and also don't flush the Oxygen but that would be my second choice if available near you.
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Boldjava
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#14: Post by Boldjava »

With respect, I disagree on storing beans, a raw food product, for two years unless they are vac packed and in a deep freeze.

Importers constantly sample cup beans to ensure freshness and quality, both beans stored in eco-packs and burlap. If they go south, they are marked down. Most importers are very clear in listing beans from previous harvests. My beans are well stored and typically begin to fade at 6-9 month mark. Professionals with whom I have spoken would agree. Buying for two years seems to be false economy, but that is merely an opinion, not fact.

Your mileage, tastes, wallet, opinion may vary. db
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Almico
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#15: Post by Almico » replying to Boldjava »

Second this.

What's the back story? Why are you buying coffee you won't need for two years? No one does this, especially commercially.

ira
Team HB

#16: Post by ira »

Sealed in air tight bags in a chest freezer is the best most of us can do.

Ira

Rickpatbrown

#17: Post by Rickpatbrown »

Boldjava wrote:With respect, I disagree on storing beans, a raw food product, for two years unless they are vac packed and in a deep freeze.

Importers constantly sample cup beans to ensure freshness and quality, both beans stored in eco-packs and burlap. If they go south, they are marked down. Most importers are very clear in listing beans from previous harvests. My beans are well stored and typically begin to fade at 6-9 month mark. Professionals with whom I have spoken would agree. Buying for two years seems to be false economy, but that is merely an opinion, not fact.

Your mileage, tastes, wallet, opinion may vary. db
Third this!

I have a bag of +1 years (~5lbs) that I'm not going roast because they have lost their magic. Granted, they are not my favorites to begin with. That's why they arent gone.

Also, you have to consider when the beans were harvested. With current shipping delays, we are a few months later getting greens than in normal, non pandemic years.

If you insist in 2 years storage, vacuum sealing and deep freezing should be in your repertoire.

Of course, if you/the people you toast for, don't demand highest quality taste, 2 years is ok. It's not going to make you sick or anything. It will taste ok, but not specialty grade.

Pressino

#18: Post by Pressino »

If you want to keep green coffee fresh over the course of several years cultivate a few coffee plants in a suitable location. 8)

warlock (original poster)

#19: Post by warlock (original poster) »

Boldjava wrote:With respect, I disagree on storing beans, a raw food product, for two years unless they are vac packed and in a deep freeze.

Importers constantly sample cup beans to ensure freshness and quality, both beans stored in eco-packs and burlap. If they go south, they are marked down. Most importers are very clear in listing beans from previous harvests. My beans are well stored and typically begin to fade at 6-9 month mark. Professionals with whom I have spoken would agree. Buying for two years seems to be false economy, but that is merely an opinion, not fact.

Your mileage, tastes, wallet, opinion may vary. db
Thanks mate, those are very valid opinions. In fact I do agree with most as well. My original idea behind this post was to look for really good storing solutions / ideas and understand what the community is working with.

Now that being said, I do personally know a bunch of coffee growers personally (like close family friends) and they were sharing that they do get a lot of demand of 1 year aged / stored coffee beans. Initially they didnt understand why this was happening and the feedback they got was the flavor profile does intensify (one gave me a aged beef cut reference as well). Now I dont have enough data or experience to validate it. How do you feel about this?

warlock (original poster)

#20: Post by warlock (original poster) »

Almico wrote:Second this.

What's the back story? Why are you buying coffee you won't need for two years? No one does this, especially commercially.
Hey Mate,

The story is sort of here in my reply to Boldjava - Storing 25-50 kg coffee greens

Essence being - longer stored might intensify the flavor profile. Would you have any experience with this? Any comments / suggestions?