Stopping roast during early First Crack?

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
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EvanOz85

#1: Post by EvanOz85 »

Hey everyone, need some advice.

In 2011, I tasted the best coffee I had ever had and still have ever had to date. It was Gimme Coffee's Kenya Kiandu, and it's what got me into home-roasting and specialty coffee in general. It also got a 95 on coffeereview.com. It tasted like freshly squeezed grapefruit juice, with a sweet juicy acidity of the likes I have yet to experience again. I've tried roasting many high-end Kenyan's attempting to get something even close to the same ballpark, to no avail.

The thing is, the Kiandu grounds were bright orange after grinding. The resulting brew also had a slight orange color. I've recently discovered just through playing around with some old beans to test my new Bullet roaster that stopping the roast right when first crack gets going also results in brightly orange colored grounds. Granted I was using years old throw-away beans just for experimenting, so the resulting smell from the grounds was like chicken-feed, but could this be what Gimme Coffee did with that Kenyan I loved so much?

Has anyone experimented with stopping the roast this early and achieving good results? Is there a method to developing the roast so that this can be achieved? Thanks

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Chert
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#2: Post by Chert »

Here's that review : " 95
Gimme! Coffee
Kenya Kiandu

Roaster Location: Ithaca, New York
Coffee Origin: Nyeri County, Central Highlands, Kenya.
Roast Level: Medium-Light
Agtron: 54/81
Est. Price: $23.00/12 ounces
Review Date: September 2011
Aroma: 8
Acidity : 9
Body: 9
Flavor: 10
Aftertaste: 9
Blind Assessment: Bright, pungent, complex. Fresh-cut fir, tartly sweet berry - strawberry, blackberry, cranberry - ripe orange and tomato in aroma and cup. Richly balanced acidity; syrupy, lively mouthfeel. Very sweet, deeply flavor-saturated finish.

Notes: Produced entirely from trees of the admired, Bourbon-derived SL28 and SL34 varieties of Arabica. The renowned Kiandu mill draws coffee from over 1,100 farmers from five different villages. Gimme! Coffee is a small-batch roaster with four espresso bars and an irreverent but passionate vision of coffee. Visit www.gimmecoffee.com or call 877-446-6325 for more information.

Who Should Drink It : A distinctive and intense yet balanced expression of the pungent/sweet fruit-toned Kenya character. "

From https://www.coffeereview.com/review/kenya-kiandu/

Is that Agtron level a cinnamon roast?

I'm fresh out of Kenyan. If I had some and I were to experiment I would try to taste over 3-4 weeks to see how a very light roast like that transforms.

There are many threads about Nordic roast style and many coffee drinkers on HB who like very light coffees so this topic has merit. I hope we learn something.
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LBIespresso
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#3: Post by LBIespresso »

Chert wrote:Here's that review : " 95
Gimme! Coffee
Kenya Kiandu

Roaster Location: Ithaca, New York
Coffee Origin: Nyeri County, Central Highlands, Kenya.
Roast Level: Medium-Light
Agtron: 54/81

Is that Agtron level a cinnamon roast?
That is quite a spread whole bean vs ground. Dang
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User avatar
EvanOz85 (original poster)

#4: Post by EvanOz85 (original poster) » replying to LBIespresso »

It sure is, isn't it? I distinctly remember being shocked by the color the first time I ran them through the grinder.

How does something like that happen?

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LBIespresso
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#5: Post by LBIespresso »

Maybe a slower roast combined with an early drop? I don't know but would love to try that. I make it up to Ithaca pretty often and am a fan of Gimme. They are very consistent.
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User avatar
civ

#6: Post by civ »

Hello:
EvanOz85 wrote: ... tasted like freshly squeezed grapefruit ...
... sweet juicy acidity ...
... bright orange after grinding.
... brew also had a slight orange color.
Hmmm ...
Quite sure it was not espresso.
As to whether it was coffee ... 8^°

Cheers,

CIV

User avatar
EvanOz85 (original poster)

#7: Post by EvanOz85 (original poster) »

civ wrote:Hmmm ...
Quite sure it was not espresso.
As to whether it was coffee ... 8^°

Cheers,

CIV

Not sure what you're implying or what this adds to the discussion?

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EddyQ

#8: Post by EddyQ »

Complete guess is that they spent more time in Maillard region (stretched), prior to first crack which completed the development very early after first crack. I've roasted coffee pretty light, but probably not this light and dropped 45s to 1min after start of first crack. Beans come out still cracking. And the roast was not underdeveloped with a 12% moisture loss. Sure, it was a bright espresso. But not total acid and very tasty.
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jevenator

#9: Post by jevenator »

sweet juicy acidity of the likes I have yet to experience again
Kenyan coffee has a special place in my heart mouth? For these kind of experiences.

I've never tried a long malliards and dropping early into FC. I might have to try this next time around.

I've had good success to get a bright tasting Kenyan coffee by going through fast roasts and dropping pretty early. The grounds are not cinnamon colored but is still pretty light. I actually find them to be the most flavorful 4-7 days post roast and then it drops off in acidity quite a bit and develops more spice notes and sweetness.



eltakeiteasy

#10: Post by eltakeiteasy »

I just looked up 81 on the Agtron scale and that is not too light it's in the med/medium light range and much darker than I have been roasting. That is odd if it has the orange color as I see that normally in roast ranging from 96-108 on the Agtron scale.
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