Small vs Big Roaster - Page 4

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
Jonk
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#31: Post by Jonk »

I'm obviously not as experienced, and I get the logistical issue, but I was going to write that I think it's a little disconcerting to judge a green sample on a single roast. If it's mostly to look for those flaws I guess it makes sense*. For heavily processed greens, some of the more funky off-notes may go away or mellow into something nice even with tad darker roast, to expand on the example with Sumatran.

*still, with luck it could turn out nice roasted dark.

I've had greens that taste great at almost any roast level and profile. More often it feels like quite specific conditions need to be met. Perhaps it makes sense in a production environment to focus on the former.. Out of curiosity, how many samples do you need to weed for every keeper?

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drgary
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#32: Post by drgary »

Sample roasting to check for defects is just a first step and is industry standard. Profile sample roasting to start to characterize a bean is a next step. You may be inadvertently combining these two stages.
Gary
LMWDP#308

What I WOULD do for a good cup of coffee!

Case17
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#33: Post by Case17 »

Nunas wrote:I'd like to see opinions from those who have used really small home roasters, such as the Ikawa and Kaffelogic, vs larger home roasters, such as the Quest, Huky and Aillio. I see a lot of interest here for those smaller roasters lately.

I've consistently moved up in roaster size from SR500 to Quest M6. I generally roast enough coffee for a week to 10-days; with the SR500, this was quite a few batches, while with the M6, it is only two. I roast before I run out, to give the roast time to off-gas.

So, with an Ikawa, does one roast every day or two? Does one stay ahead of the need for coffee to allow for off-gassing? Or, does one do a bunch of back-to-back roasts, like I used to do with the SR500?
My experiences is that as the size goes up, it becomes more of a process to do a roasting day.
I started with a SR500 (I think, it's been 10+ years), which is nice in that it's a fast set up and easy to use, but pretty small and you'd need to roast frequently to supply just yourself.

Moved up to Behmor; now I could supply not just myself but some family (but really I was stretching it). Process a bit more extensive, yield much higher, though it resulted in me tending to switch to less frequent, but longer, roast days. I started to vac seal my roasts.

Once you get to Huky and Aillio, you are more at systems that bridge home roaster and small shop. I tend to roast 10+ lbs in any given session, but rarely do small sessions.

Likely the compromise is to spend more time learning how to optimize your set-up, so that the time/head-aches involved in setting up the roasting, working up the roasted beans, etc... are minimized.

If one wants to roast only for themselves (and maybe a spouse), the ideal set up would probably be a smaller roast, so long as it good process control features that tend to not appear until you hit Huky/Aillio range (but plenty here modify smaller roasts, etc...).

Quester
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#34: Post by Quester »

Jonk wrote:The main reason I sold the KL is that I never found a profile that could reliably roast light well, without venturing into the extreme.
I assume "KL" is reference the Kaffelogic Nano. I'm sad to hear that, because I'm having a bit of trouble with lighter roasts too (even medium-light). They are all a bit roasty. I'm down to under 1.0 on "lightness setting", which means about 30-45 seconds past first crack. Total roast time of ~7:00. I've calibrated the fan for my elevation (Denver), but have not been able to create results as good as the FreshRoast 800 I was experimenting with before. Although I wouldn't call those results exceptional either--just decent.

Today, I roasted some Prodigal Bella Vista Washed Colombia (Scott Rao) beans just to make sure the greens were high quality. But even with stopping around 30 seconds after first crack, they still seem too dark. I'm newer to roasting, so I'm hoping this is more about me than the Nano. It really is a joy to use.

Jonk
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#35: Post by Jonk »

drgary wrote:Sample roasting to check for defects is just a first step and is industry standard. Profile sample roasting to start to characterize a bean is a next step. You may be inadvertently combining these two stages.
This is a thread about home roasting after all.
Quester wrote:I assume "KL" is reference the Kaffelogic Nano.
Yes. The best profile I've tried for truly light roasts is called JRoast. You can find it in the unofficial Kaffelogic discord. But for me it was very much hit or miss, riding a fine line between underdeveloped or tasty after weeks of rest.

By the way, contradicting myself about drum vs. air, if someone with a fluid bed want to go the other way and try something with more convection and very low airflow, there's a pretty decent and inexpensive roaster called Kaka G400 (unfortunate name? :lol: well here it means cookie) that you can use on a gas stove:

Milligan
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#36: Post by Milligan »

Quester wrote: Today, I roasted some Prodigal Bella Vista Washed Colombia (Scott Rao) beans just to make sure the greens were high quality. But even with stopping around 30 seconds after first crack, they still seem too dark. I'm newer to roasting, so I'm hoping this is more about me than the Nano. It really is a joy to use.
Time is only part of the equation for a good light roast. The rate of rise during first crack matters. The lower the RoR along with a longer duration will give a more consistent bean color from exterior to interior. With quality bean you can ease into first crack start and then practically kill the heat. Let it cruise for 1-1:30min and then drop. You may only get a 5-10F rise after first crack but have a nicely developed bean.

Some roasts don't even hit a rolling first crack. They slow the burners right as they approach first crack and cruise down to 0 RoR right before they drop. Development at that point may only be 5F above "first crack" but they are developed thoroughly from exterior to interior. The worst "light" roasts are ones that come in too fast into first crack and are pulled early. You tend to get underdeveloped notes with roasty notes.
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Quester
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#37: Post by Quester replying to Milligan »

That's helpful, thanks.