Santoker 500/Revolution 500 Roaster - Page 2

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
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TomC (original poster)
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#11: Post by TomC (original poster) »

The cyclone disconnects at the bottom and the chaff goes right into a waiting waste bin. Not much to it. I didn't see a single stray bit of chaff anywhere, and I looked hard for it. I'll let Dustin speak to the two trays (one under the drum, one under the cooling tray) as to long term collection of waste, but we checked on my 5 roasts, and there weren't really anything in them.

He's already torn it completely apart once, and partially apart once. I think the key to maintaining one of these is to promptly respond to new squeaks if they occur, and check your lubrication points.

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arcus
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#12: Post by arcus »

Now this looks very interesting! I've never roasted before but have been reading most of the roaster threads lately as I'd love to have a prosumer machine that I won't want to upgrade in a year or two. My only concern is the steep learning curve for a beginner and my wife. I think I can win her over because it's still a lot cheaper than a toy car :D

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TomC (original poster)
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#13: Post by TomC (original poster) »

If you've never roasted, it will likely be easier for you than for me. I've been roasting for 13 years now. I have a lot of ingrained habits and flaws that come with that. My point was more to the fact that transitioning from the electric Quest to a commercial gas unit would require some recalibration on my end. Coming at it with a clean slate might be easier, since you wont have the bias and mental hurdles to clear. You'll make a few batches of sub stellar coffee, but it will be the fun part of the learning process.

I think gas roasters can be more "reactive" instead of having to be so "proactive" on an electrically heated unit. That's a good thing.

Marshall_S

#14: Post by Marshall_S »

A clear upgrade path from the Quest... this thread is a disaster for me...
+1
LMWDP#384

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hankua
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#15: Post by hankua »

Awesome!!! This roaster checks all the boxes and then some, kind of an improved Mini500. :wink:
Well done Dustin!

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arcus
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#16: Post by arcus »

If you've never roasted, it will likely be easier for you than for me.
Thanks Tom, that makes it sound even more interesting. Btw, I finally added that foam base you recommended 3 months ago on my HG-1. It definitely made a nice improvement :)

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drgary
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#17: Post by drgary »

TomC wrote:If you've never roasted, it will likely be easier for you than for me.... You'll make a few batches of sub stellar coffee, but it will be the fun part of the learning process.
Most of the coffee is drinkable if you pay attention and don't lose control of your roast. Not having many roasts under my belt gives me a chance to practice my primitive latte "art."
Gary
LMWDP#308

What I WOULD do for a good cup of coffee!

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bean2friends

#18: Post by bean2friends »

I'm surely tempted. I roast now on an RK drum - 2 pound lots - in the garage. It's a primitive set up in a way, but that means I can just leave it out there and not worry about damage to the unit in the winter. Winter time in Northern Indiana can be pretty inhospitable. So, I'm pretty sure I wouldn't want to leave this unit out there in the garage when it gets down to 20 degrees F. I wonder if I could set this unit up in my unfinished basement?

jerbear00

#19: Post by jerbear00 »

This looks like a lot of fun. Some day I will try to develop this level of roast sophistication.

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Boldjava

#20: Post by Boldjava »

kwantfm wrote:Tom,

... this thread is a disaster for me...

Terence
Post of the summer <howling>. Know the feeling.

B|Java
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LMWDP #339