Sample/small roaster that doesn't require outside venting? - Page 2

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
mgrayson
Supporter ♡

#11: Post by mgrayson »

yakster wrote:The reaction bi-products of roasting coffee are unhealthy and must be vented, especially when you are roasting multiple batches.
I looked up the research on that. While true, it is noted that *grinding* coffee releases four times as much of the harmful chemicals. The danger is if you are working someplace that roasts 10,000 lbs. If you are consuming whatever you roast, the added health hazard is small.

Matt

Capuchin Monk

#12: Post by Capuchin Monk »

mgrayson wrote:I looked up the research on that. While true, it is noted that *grinding* coffee releases four times as much of the harmful chemicals.
:shock: Got any links on that? I would like to look it up.

Milligan

#13: Post by Milligan »

At first glance, I would think products of combustion (smoke and gases) would be more harmful than aromatics released from grinding coffee. I have heard of diacetyl being of concern for production roasters. Most roasters have the roaster ventilated AND a vent hood above the cooling tray to catch smoke and gases released when opening the drum door. We aren't talking about acute issues, but long term occupational exposure. I would think for a home roaster that allergic effects would be a bigger concern than long term effects.

mgrayson
Supporter ♡

#14: Post by mgrayson »

Capuchin Monk wrote::shock: Got any links on that? I would like to look it up.
There is a thread on this site about Diacetyl.
Also
https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/flavorings/limits.html
And
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7531227/

Grinding and flavoring are the most dangerous.

OTOH, as mentioned above, professional roasters DO have ventilation and the Ikawa's do not.

GDM528

#15: Post by GDM528 »

Frenchman wrote:Haha. Yes, maybe. Hopefully we can also pull some experience out of that legendary context. I remember when Cafe Vita offered public cuppings to learn, for example (something I didn't pay enough attention to).

This is fodder for a different post in the Coffees forum, but I think I need to find some good modern coffee roasters in Seattle. I find that many roast too dark for.me: Seattle definitely started on the dark side with Vivace (which i loved, but have evolved away from). I started building a small list from Internet readings but haven't tried them. I buy Kuma now when buying loca (or order from Rogue Wave Coffee because we all think that Canada is local too ;)).

But first I will have to go through the 29 bags of coffees roasted in Australia that I brought back in May, and resist the temptation to bring home a lot of Parisian roasted beans like I did last year too :D.
We each live in the only two cities that have Wikipedia articles for their coffee culture. In some respects that's a unique opportunity to learn the craft in the presence of so many masters. I bet many of the residents of the maker space you describe would relish that challenge - but they got day jobs, right? So a roaster that essentially resets after every use might be better suited to a cadre of users that keep their own personal preferences on their phones and get the same result every time they transfer their profile to the roaster.

Small-batch roasting machines (not necessarily the same thing as a sample roaster) aren't efficient at merely supplying demand, but ideal IMHO for experimentation. A bad roast is dispensed with in just 2-3 double espresso shots. Moving to a small batch roaster has changed my psychology from searching for the perfect roast profile, to deliberately tweaking and experimenting as my tasting moods shift around - at a pace much faster than I could accomplish buying bags of local artisan coffee. A maker space is ideal for developing the accoutrements for a small-batch system as I have with a ziplock bag hangar design. Same holds for one of your makers correcting the missing temperature probe in the Ikawa Home Ikawa Home thermal performance

ShotPull

#16: Post by ShotPull »

Trjelenc wrote:The period from when it yellows to tan and into brown smells incredible. First crack and beyond is definitely meh
Not to me. It's not an unpleasant smell at any of the stages, it's just not a GOOD smell at any of them either, to me anyway. I will agree the initial stage is better ... kind of a little nut smell.

vulne

#17: Post by vulne »

Without external ventilation, and to get a good experience, dedicated to let more people learn coffee bean roaster, single roasting volume can be between 100-200g small coffee bean roaster can be more efficient and convenient, the best price can be affordable, based on the above conditions set Kaleido Sniper M1 this small machine may be able to meet your expectations, you can go to understand the next

Capuchin Monk

#18: Post by Capuchin Monk »

This is for cooling tray exhaust but maybe possible for small volume roasting exhaust?

Trjelenc

#19: Post by Trjelenc »

ShotPull wrote:Not to me. It's not an unpleasant smell at any of the stages, it's just not a GOOD smell at any of them either, to me anyway. I will agree the initial stage is better ... kind of a little nut smell.
To each their own. I think it has a nice sweet, bready, toasted grain type smell. Reminds me of going to a brewery with a strong malty smell

GDM528

#20: Post by GDM528 »

Capuchin Monk wrote:This is for cooling tray exhaust but maybe possible for small volume roasting exhaust?
Not sure if I followed the links correctly, but I think it's a polyester reticulated foam filter. It can catch ash particles, but not likely the molecular soup coming off the beans as they roast. And speaking of roast, the air coming out of a roaster is really (really) hot. It would melt the air filter in short order. With an accessory handle, the Ikawa could double as a paint stripper :)