Roast and Learn Together - July 2014 - Page 2

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
User avatar
TomC (original poster)
Team HB

#11: Post by TomC (original poster) »

ChrisR wrote:.... This coffee took forever to get going. I used the same profile I used for the DP Yirgacheffe Aricha and I did not reach 300 degrees until 7:44, while the Aricha was there at 5:45.......

Many of Yemen's best coffees grow at altitudes exceeding 7000 feet. They are dense, hard as rocks beans. They usually need a swift kick in the ass to get going, heat wise. You can always roast smaller batches, but generally I tend to hit Yemen's a bit hard and finish them with kid gloves, or they'll end up tasting like kid gloves, or yak gloves, etc..The leathery funk on some Yemens can really jump out towards the end if care isn't taken, but as well, it's also frequently part of the beans natural makeup, which turns many people off from them.

Me, I like them.
Join us and support Artisan Roasting Software=https://artisan-scope.org/donate/

User avatar
SAS
Supporter ♡

#12: Post by SAS »

TomC wrote:...The leathery funk on some Yemens can really jump out towards the end if care isn't taken, but as well, it's also frequently part of the beans natural makeup, which turns many people off from them.

Me, I like them.
TomC, I admire your honesty. My efforts on the Yemen Haraarzi Red Cherry yielded great tasting coffee but with a slight rubber tire like taste at the end of a sip. I tried to roast this flavor out of the bean thinking it was a roasting defect; and never succeeded. I tried aging the roasted coffee longer thinking it would just fade away and it never did. I actually didn't find the flavor objectionable, as I have enjoyed the strong burnt rubber flavor of Vietnamese coffee, with its sweetened condensed milk buffer.

Since I feel I am still a beginner, I'm cautious about thinking I did a good job on a bean if it has unusual flavors. I felt that way about the Yemen.

On the other hand when I roasted the Kenyan Makwa AB and got mushroom and cedar forest soil flavors, Mr. Temple set me on the right path and my results improved.
LMWDP #280
Running on fumes.

Espresso Forge: brew truly incredible espresso at home
Sponsored by Espresso Forge
User avatar
TomC (original poster)
Team HB

#13: Post by TomC (original poster) »

Moshe, your mention of the Red Mountains brings to mind the stark contrast in processing and green aroma between it and this coming July's Yemen. I roasted it on Tuesday for a blender component for espresso drinks. The greens smell pretty bad, like dried peas mixed with an uncleaned barn animal pen. I still have some of the Red Mountains from this last go around, and more importantly, from the previous offering where they were just mind-blowing and changed what anyone thought of a Yemen. Those greens smelled great and the processing was quite well done for a Yemen.

This new coffee for July is interesting and it's wonderfully complex in its flavor profile. It will make a welcome addition to any espresso blend. I won't bother posting my profile, it was my typical investigative roast of a hard bean, except I pushed it for espresso with a longer finish, knowing that they're small size tend to move very fast. I'm enjoying what I'm seeing in the cup now, but the Quest is overdue for a cleaning by at least 6-8 roasts, so I'll do that and re-profile it to see what pans out.

This coffee was a great choice for RLT because it's so versatile. And the finish on this bean is lingering, buttery and evolves thru many wonderful flavors.
Join us and support Artisan Roasting Software=https://artisan-scope.org/donate/

User avatar
Boldjava
Supporter ♡

#14: Post by Boldjava »

TomC wrote:...
This coffee was a great choice for RLT because it's so versatile. And the finish on this bean is lingering, buttery and evolves thru many wonderful flavors.
And as ugly as original sin. It makes a very strong case for not eye-cupping.
-----
LMWDP #339

User avatar
TomC (original poster)
Team HB

#15: Post by TomC (original poster) »

I can't pull shots with it yet, but I just ran a batch thru my new Cona siphon. I'n glad that it holds on to so many deep, complex distillates, without going hide-y. It's going to be a blast playing around with this coffee, not only on the profile, but the % of the blend if we do melange roasts, or in my case, just for kicks on the test batch, I used some of the Bolivian micro lot, with a nice pulped natural Brazil.
Join us and support Artisan Roasting Software=https://artisan-scope.org/donate/

User avatar
PacMan

#16: Post by PacMan »

Boldjava wrote:And as ugly as original sin. It makes a very strong case for not eye-cupping.
I just did my first roast of this coffee and this stood out the most. Very different looking than the El salvador black honey I just finished. The looks of the bean really threw me off while roasting. Will post the profile I ended up with and how it tastes after a few days of rest.

User avatar
johnny4lsu

#17: Post by johnny4lsu »

Got my coffee ordered.. Look forward to teaching y'all a lesson! Haha J/K... Can't wait to learn more from each of y'all..

ECM Manufacture: @ecmespresso #weliveespresso
Sponsored by ECM Manufacture
caffeinatedjen

#18: Post by caffeinatedjen »

I just ordered two pounds of each. To get it going with a blast of heat like you were saying, would you recommend using p1 on the Behmor instead of P3?

User avatar
MrPootywinkle

#19: Post by MrPootywinkle »

5lbs roasted 5 different ways and resting. Will cup over the holiday weekend and try a bunch of different mixes. Turns out I'm near another participant who is more knowledgable about espresso (I'm a brewed coffee guy) and he has kindly agreed to pull some shots and give notes. Should be interesting!

User avatar
johnny4lsu

#20: Post by johnny4lsu »

Any chance that you can post your graphs if you have them? Would help tremendously for those of us trying to learn.