Quest M3 Mods - Page 5

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
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AssafL

#41: Post by AssafL »

TomC wrote:Sorry, I didn't see this till now. I had considered doing something like that, but I couldn't picture in my head how I'd be able to drill a sufficient quantity without grossly distorting the roundness of the drum. Plus it would take a significant amount of holes drilled and any coffee that is sitting in that section of the drum will get different levels of conductive heat transfer than the coffee towards the front. Plus there's way more places for chaff to get stuck or bits of beans to get stuck and being that close to the heat source just sounds like a really bad idea all around. I wouldn't recommend going that route.

It was far easier for my buddy to just mount it on his lathe, trim off the back and tack weld the screen on. He said it was an hour of work, only because he had to undo the mistake he made ( welding the wall onto the front by mistake) before redoing the work on the rear. So the front isn't pretty, but darn it works nice.

One observation that I'm noting so far that I like is that I can just leave the airflow maxed out at 1C and just tapper off the heat. I get cleaner coffee (less chaff) and the cup results are screaming at me that I should have done this long ago.
Interesting. Just convinced me to do the same.

Curious about the perforations. I know that some drums come perforated. Some of the Coffee tech drum roasters have perforated drum options. Doesn't seem that chaff is an issue. Drilling lots of holes is indeed lots of work, but given I do not have access to a metal shop, it is my only DIY option.

Also, I always assumed beans tend to go forward due to the slant of the slats in the drum (sort of screw shape). So there will be fewer beans in the back.
Scraping away (slowly) at the tyranny of biases and dogma.

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ira
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#42: Post by ira »

I wonder if three 1" holes cut in the back with a hole saw and three triangular pieces of screen attached to the inside with small screws and nuts would work as well? It would sure be a lot easier. Here are links to reasonably priced foot square pieces of what might be suitable stainless and steel for that task.

http://www.onlinemetals.com/merchant.cf ... op_cat=849

http://www.onlinemetals.com/merchant.cf ... &top_cat=1

Ira

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AssafL

#43: Post by AssafL » replying to ira »

What do you mean by "back"? The idea is to get more hot air into the drum. If you make holes in the back of the sleeve you'll let in cold air.
Scraping away (slowly) at the tyranny of biases and dogma.

OldmatefromOZ

#44: Post by OldmatefromOZ »

My hand / arm hurts. :x Still, once I got into a rhythm it became much easier.

Realised I needed to mount the sheet properly to a piece of wood....helped a lot.
Cooling the drill bit in water after each hole made a HUGE difference.
I lost one bit to heat after about 1/4 holes were done. After working out that I needed to cool the bit after every hole the rest were a lot easier.

De burred both sides and brushed it with the dremel. Probably get it back from welder in a few days.


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AssafL

#45: Post by AssafL »

Cool drilling operation! I drilled 15 holes in the drum and gave up....

How are you going to shorten the drum? Disk cutter?
Scraping away (slowly) at the tyranny of biases and dogma.

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AssafL

#46: Post by AssafL »

So I drilled holes in the back inch or so of the drum. So airflow is better.

I was thinking about how to increase contact time between the air and the heating elements: A tin pipe that fits snugly in the rear entry hole, runs the length of the roaster, and has and ample number holes drilled along the sides towards the heating elements.

Air would be pulled in from the back through the pipe and flow around the heaters?

Anybody try something like that?
Scraping away (slowly) at the tyranny of biases and dogma.

ira
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#47: Post by ira »

AssafL wrote:What do you mean by "back"? The idea is to get more hot air into the drum. If you make holes in the back of the sleeve you'll let in cold air.
I meant back of the drum.

Ira

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AssafL

#48: Post by AssafL » replying to ira »

I guess I am not sure what you mean. The back of the Quest M3 is open. There is no back and no front. Just a hollow tube with an axel.

Tom shortened his drum by 1/2 and inch (to allow for air to flow in), so to prevent the beans from falling out the back, he had to close the back with a perforated sheet.

When you say drill large holes - do you mean in the actual drum body? why not just drill small holes in the drum?
Scraping away (slowly) at the tyranny of biases and dogma.

OldmatefromOZ

#49: Post by OldmatefromOZ »

AssafL wrote:Cool drilling operation! I drilled 15 holes in the drum and gave up....

How are you going to shorten the drum? Disk cutter?


Thanks.

I have given it to a professional metal worker to do the rest. He gave me the small piece of sheet to drill myself, he was not interested in drilling lots of small holes. Much better out of my amature hands.
AssafL wrote:So I drilled holes in the back inch or so of the drum. So airflow is better.

I was thinking about how to increase contact time between the air and the heating elements: A tin pipe that fits snugly in the rear entry hole, runs the length of the roaster, and has and ample number holes drilled along the sides towards the heating elements.

Air would be pulled in from the back through the pipe and flow around the heaters?

Anybody try something like that?
I had some thoughts along similar lines a while ago as I was leaning to a mod that I could do completely myself.

I do not see why it would not help heat the air. That tube will get pretty hot and heat the air very quickly. You could prob have the tube with many perforations.

ira
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#50: Post by ira »

Sorry, I've never seen a Quest and I assumed the back of the drum was closed. Well, at least it's a reasonable price for a suitable piece of perforated stainless. I don't know the drum diameter, but that might be enough for 4 drums.

Ira