Quest M3 : Disassembling to swap heating elements

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
badperson

#1: Post by badperson »

Hi,

I am in the process of taking apart my Quest M3 for the first time to swap out a bad heating element (way overdue for a cleaing, I know...)

I'm trying to remove the 4 allen screws as per this sweet marias video
(see 0:06)

on my allen set, the 7/64 seems to be too small, and the 1/8 seems to be too big. I'm concerned about stripping the screws. Can anyone confirm those screw sizes, and what is the best tool for this?

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CarefreeBuzzBuzz

#2: Post by CarefreeBuzzBuzz »

Like a 3MM then. You need metric for a Quest. @Nunas will know.
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RobertL

#3: Post by RobertL »

Thanks for posting this. My Quest is due for its first cleaning and I've been wondering what tools I would need. Headed to Amazon for a metric allen set.

Nunas
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#4: Post by Nunas »

Michael is correct, you need a metric set for working on the Quest. You don't need an expensive one, as nothing is (or should be) torqued down hard. The screws on the bean chute are 3 mm and all the little screws holding the case together and the ones holding the front plate are 2.5. This is likely true for all Quest models, as this is what's on my M3 Mk-2 and my M6. You should be able to get a metric set at any auto parts store...even Walmart these days.

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CarefreeBuzzBuzz

#5: Post by CarefreeBuzzBuzz »

FWIW I recently picked this up for convenience mostly as I have found need/ease of use with the ratchet.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/DEWALT-Ratc ... /202723414
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badperson (original poster)

#6: Post by badperson (original poster) »

Quick trip to the hardware store set me up...thnx!!!

Next question...am I correct in guessing that the only access to the heating elements is from inside the drum housing? ( Haven't finished cleaning yet :mrgreen: )



I didn't see a way at it from the back. What kind of wrench do u guys use for this?

Nunas
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#7: Post by Nunas »

See those four bolt heads, one near the end of each element; that's what holds them in. You need a metric socket (sorry, don't know the size) with an extension. Don't forget to take off the wires first, from the back.

PS When you know the wrench size please PM me; I'll include it in the Quest handbook. Thanks!

badperson (original poster)

#8: Post by badperson (original poster) »

and does the entire back part of the roaster disassemble from the drum housing? It wasn't clear to me how to do that.
jw

badperson (original poster)

#9: Post by badperson (original poster) »

in the post here, TomC talks about moving that metal plate that supports the fan and conceals the electronics. In the post he notes TWO screws that are blocked by the front of the roaster that houses the drum.

In this picture I am seeing THREE screws I need to remove. (that fourth, larger metric screw was removed no problem, and I realize how filthy this machine is...way overdue for a cleaning) The post is dated 2013, so maybe an older version of the quest?



It isn't clear to me how to remove the front part of the roaster. Can anyone give me some pointers as to where the screws are that hold it in place? I was able to wiggle the fan out of its housing and see a screw there attached to a wire circled in red



the circles in green (I think) are the wires attached to the heating element. But what is the wire in circled in red connected to?

thanks!

Nunas
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#10: Post by Nunas »

badperson wrote:and does the entire back part of the roaster disassemble from the drum housing? It wasn't clear to me how to do that.
jw
No, not this! Way too much unnecessary work. Just remove the front plate and the drum. Also, remove the cover from the electrical bay; it has the cooling fan on it; the fan wires plug into a little white connector with a spring-release tab. From the inside of the electrical bay, using a 5.5 mm socket, take the wires off the four heater connections (or just the dead heater if only replacing that). From the front, with the drum out, using a 7 mm socket, remove the bolts from the defective heater(s). The heater(s) will come right out. They are connected to the roasting chamber backplate only with those four bolts. They pass through holes in the backplate and the rear compartment, where they are not connected to anything except the wires.
t isn't clear to me how to remove the front part of the roaster. Can anyone give me some pointers as to where the screws are that hold it in place? I was able to wiggle the fan out of its housing and see a screw there attached to a wire circled in red
Remove the two top screws holding the bean chute, being careful not to let the air tube fall, as it's not secured on the bosses; remove the two identical screws on the left and right side of the front plate (not the recessed ones). I think they are 3 mm hex.
I realize how filthy this machine is...way overdue for a cleaning)
You don't need to take it all apart to clean this. First, use a soft brush such as brass to get the loose stuff off, sucking it up with a vacuum. Then use alcohol swabs; I use the ones they sell for hand sanitization. You'll be surprised how well this works. Use Q-tips and alcohol on the fan blades. If the fan is really bad, remove it (you'll have to cut the wires on older units and use connectors to reinstall). Put a Cafiza solution in a container and lower the fan blower part into it. Be careful to only soak the blower, not the motor. The motor has two bearings in it that won't take kindly a soaking in Cafiza. The fan will come out like new. Now that it's clean, use a small hex wrench (sorry, don't know the size) and remove the fan to get at any crud behind it. If you clean the fan regularly thereafter, you only have to loosen this screw to remove the fan and c clean it and the squirrel-cage with alcohol.

BTW, if you remove the motor winding assembly from the fan, you must put it back exactly as it was (take a photo). If you put it on upside down, the fan will run backwards and move very little air.