Panama Kotowa Duncan natural roasting discussion

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
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drgary
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#1: Post by drgary »

I roasted the Panama Kotowa Duncan natural yesterday, ground it this morning and let the grounds degas for an hour, then immersion brewed it in a Clever Dripper. It's too soon to tell what it will be like after proper rest. I'm tasting apricot sweetness and acidity primarily. The rest are hints to describe a rounded flavor profile: a hint of blackberry/strawberry sweetness, medium dark chocolate, malt, bitters that transition from grapefruit rind to walnut and a hint of leather as it cools. Cooling also brings the malt forward, blended with the chocolate. Overall, it's mild with medium body. The mouthfeel has a hint of astringency.

Is this an ideal roast? Who knows? The roast yielded lots of dark chaff. I started cool with a 90 sec soak, marked end of dry at 320°F at 5:51, 1C at 8:30 and 381°F, drop at 408°F and 10:06, which was 27°F into 1C, as 1C was waning. This profile has generally been good for Ethiopian naturals on my roaster. I was working with an improvised thermocouple arrangement after connections to my Phidget got wonky, so I primarily drove this roast with environmental temp, keeping it steady near the end. I think this roast has a nice balance between acidity and development.

For my next roast, I'd still want to start slow and cool because it's a natural with lots of chaff. But I might want to take it a bit darker to see if that brings out more fruit sweetness and chocolate. I think this will be a mild and very balanced cup, and it's pretty clean for a natural.
Gary
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mkane
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#2: Post by mkane »

Thanks for that. My first roast started to crash so it was dropped early. Still very drinkable.

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mkane
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#3: Post by mkane »

Nice coffee as a PO. Nice and clean, mildly sweet, great nose. I think I dropped this @ 415°, 1:45 into 1C. I'll try and let it cool and get back to this.

Hoping I can get a better handle on this coffee before I reach the bottom of the 5# bag.

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mkane
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#4: Post by mkane »

OP nails the leather cooled. Sometimes I brew a cup and let it sit to drink later on in the day.

mpdeem
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#5: Post by mpdeem »

Thank you for starting this thread, gives me some ideas on how best to approach this coffee while waiting for my coffee budget to recover.

I am inclined to start a little darker intially as sometimes I am underwhelmed by my light roasts of natural processed Central American coffees. This has more to do with my roasting than origin..approaching Centrals in the same manner as an Ethiopia Dry Process...which is rather silly on my part.

By starting slightly darker (bordering Full City) I get a better idea of the coffee's overall capacity. From there I can start dialing the roast and time back, watching for loss of sweetness or complexity as those are two issues I struggle with when going super light.

Would love to see roasting profiles for this coffee. Doesn't have to be perfect...a work in progess model is fine :)

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drgary (original poster)
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#6: Post by drgary (original poster) »

Here you go. This is the roast described in the opening post after letting grounds rest enough to be tasted. It's now naturally resting and is 8 days post-roast. I'll give another impression as soon as it opens up and will then have a better idea of target drop temp. My aim in this roast was to keep ET steady rather than closely track the BT ROR. As noted above, the BT measurement was erratic as the tiny wires were no longer being secured in the Phidget and I had to get them to work in a mini plug that feeds into an Amprobe data logger.



As several roasting consultants say, the reading you get off of a thermocouple measures the thermocouple. In an air roaster like the IKAWA, holding steady temp may be the key. For a hefty drum roaster like this, reducing measured ET slightly while keeping it above BT to smooth the BT ROR curve may reflect that there's infrared heat and drum heat also being absorbed that may not be fully seen in ET. Does the hump and apparent crash and flick mean the coffee will lack sweetness and taste a bit hollow? Will it come out just fine because steady heat allowed the coffee to keep developing well? This coffee could be so sweet that it would taste fine to me and could be sweeter. I'll only know with side-by-side cuppings because another truism emphasizes getting to know your particular roaster.
Gary
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mpdeem
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#7: Post by mpdeem »

drgary wrote:Here you go. This is the roast described in the opening post after letting grounds rest enough to be tasted. It's now naturally resting and is 8 days post-roast. I'll give another impression as soon as it opens up and will then have a better idea of target drop temp. My aim in this roast was to keep ET steady rather than closely track the BT ROR.
Thanks so much for sharing your roast profile. While I am on a different roast set up, your profile still gives me an idea of a general approach.
drgary wrote:Does the hump and apparent crash and flick mean the coffee will lack sweetness and taste a bit hollow? Will it come out just fine because steady heat allowed the coffee to keep developing well? This coffee could be so sweet that it would taste fine to me and could be sweeter. I'll only know with side-by-side cuppings because another truism emphasizes getting to know your particular roaster.
Would be interested to hear how this translates to the cup.

My roasting methodology is a little atypical in that I reach peak temp about 1 minute post First Crack...and then allow the temp to drop back a little for the last 30 seconds of the roast. In essence my roast ends on a slight downward slope -as opposed to ending on at the peak temp or at a slight plateau after reaching peak temp. My reasons for doing this have more to do with wanting the ability to extend the peak temp period without necessarily lengthening the roast. This not to say however, that I think the more conventional approach of ending at peak temp-at the end of a steady ascent is wrong/bad or that my method is better. Rather my method of ending with a slight downward transiton is a personal preference....and not one set in stone per se.

Pre charging/drop temps - I just drop the beans in the chamber at ambient temp..but I am roasting inside in a temp controlled environment and with a much smaller amount of beans and chamber size. In the past I have experimented with preheating my popper chamber but often end up loosing some acidity and higher range sweet notes....the resulting coffee being nice but lacking a little zing and even sometimes sweetness. I suspect this is again due to working with tiny roast batches & chamber size compared to the rest of you ;) Like everything else, however, I am not beyond further experimentation should anyone feel inclined to make suggestions ;)

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#8: Post by mpdeem »

drgary wrote:....and a hint of leather as it cools. Cooling also brings the malt forward, blended with the chocolate. Overall, it's mild with medium body. The mouthfeel has a hint of astringency.
mkane wrote:OP nails the leather cooled. Sometimes I brew a cup and let it sit to drink later on in the day.
All this talk of leather has me curious....is this leather as in a Yemani, with a sort of wild slightly gamey animal hide type note? Or is more refined like sweet saddle leather-tobacco type note?

Thanks for the great tasting notes...just reading them makes me wish I had some of this on hand now.

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drgary (original poster)
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#9: Post by drgary (original poster) »

It's a tiny hint of how a new leather jacket smells.
Gary
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drgary (original poster)
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#10: Post by drgary (original poster) »

The roast turned out fine for filter coffee. On Day 9, it's a very elegant coffee. The mouthfeel is tea-like, the acidity and sweetness nicely balance each other. No flavors particularly stand out. The main characteristic is a very mild apricot-like acidity. My next attempt might take it 30 sec further into development to see what flavors show up. I may also try to better replicate the Rao steady BT ROR decline. There's a slightly "washed out" flavor, but that may be fixed with a slight updose. There's no roasty flavor. This is very drinkable.
Gary
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What I WOULD do for a good cup of coffee!