New Yemen Haraaz - Page 3

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
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drgary
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#21: Post by drgary »

I'm sipping my first test roast, done November 7, so it's Day 9. I brewed a mug with a 3 cup Chemex. This may need more time to open up, because as it sits in the cup at room temperature beyond 10 minutes, it gets more pleasing and complex, with acidity balancing sweetness. The acidity is a bit stronger and malic. The sweetness is like fine dark chocolate. I'm starting to get something subtle like raspberry. Mouthfeel is tea-like and smooth. For a Yemen this is a clean cup. My lowest reliable batch size, at least at my current skill level, is 350g. I'm experimenting with keeping ET steady and adjusting minimally rather than being so exacting on BT ROR, as suggested by an expert friend. My next batch will attempt a lower ET charge temp so I go into 1C with a bit less momentum and avoid the plateau and soft crash during 1C.

Moisture loss was 13%. Dry was 3 min 21 sec, ramp was 4 min 12 sec, 1CS was at 7:30. Development was 2 min. I dropped it at target temp of about 15°F above 1CS, which was 42 sec after FCE.

Gary
LMWDP#308

What I WOULD do for a good cup of coffee!

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Zaneemomo (original poster)
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#22: Post by Zaneemomo (original poster) »


mgrayson
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#23: Post by mgrayson »

Apologies for a general and naive question.

I have not roasted in a decade and am considering another try. The roasted coffees I buy work well for what I make - mostly espresso and milk drinks, but the possibilities get vaster with roasting one's own.

Let's start with some green coffee (The Yemen in this thread, for instance). We could end up with, say, drip, espresso, or a milk drink. In between, there is a roasting process, and a brewing process. Of the three final drinks, is this coffee vastly better for one than the others? Or a complete waste of time for one, but good on the other two? Assuming the roast is chosen to best target a particular drink. This is partially addressed in the FAQ's, but is there a reasonable rule of thumb like "don't waste your money on coffee X greens if you plan to make espresso" or "coffee Y will make good lattes, but you have to roast it like this.." or "learn to use a pour-over, n00b" :D

Thank you, oh experienced roasters,

Matt

(I notice a thread titled "Learning about green coffee. Perhaps this question is better there.)

olutheros

#24: Post by olutheros »

mgrayson wrote: is there a reasonable rule of thumb like "don't waste your money on coffee X greens if you plan to make espresso" or "coffee Y will make good lattes, but you have to roast it like this.." or "learn to use a pour-over, n00b" :D
At this point I think people routinely make espresso out of literally the most expensive coffees in the world (especially when they have grinders like the one in your profile). Pretty much all good quality coffee has the potential to be whatever you want it to be, though you can influence its characteristics and taste through your roast profile.

Common sense exceptions apply, of course -- you may not want to drop your very acidic, nordic-roasted kenyan in a steamed cup of milk. But something like this particular coffee can work for anything you want it to.

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drgary
Team HB

#25: Post by drgary »

I believe the last two posts are a conversation worthy of their own thread. Here it is, so others can join in.

What coffees do you roast for espresso?
Gary
LMWDP#308

What I WOULD do for a good cup of coffee!

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TomC
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#26: Post by TomC »

Zaneemomo wrote:Another new offering...
https://www.roastmasters.com/yemen-rajeh-husein.html

Mine arrived yesterday, but I think I'll wait till after Thanksgiving to tackle it. I only bought 2 pounds. I certainly don't want to eff it up.
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