New Ikawa Home Roaster - 100g capacity - Page 34

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
ira
Team HB

#331: Post by ira »

GDM528 wrote:The thermodynamics of coffee roasting has been studied (by a Brazilian university, of course) and the thermal conductivity and diffusivity is known. So yeah, if you know the temperature just outside the bean you can calculate the temperature inside the bean, and the most appropriate unit for that delay would be seconds, not minutes.
So basically you're saying, the only important thing is the height and penetration of the probe into the bean mass. I would assume the higher it is the closer it will be to the actual bean temperature as the air and beans will have had more chance to stabilize. How penetration factors is much less clear, though I notice the probe on the pro goes quite far into the bean mass.

Ira

mtbizzle

#332: Post by mtbizzle »

GDM528 wrote:My new Ikawa Home (V2) works just fine with the "old" Android version of the app - and I ain't never gonna update it!
Thanks for the reply! Is there a way to disable Android app updates?.. :?:

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yakster
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#333: Post by yakster »

Or archive the APK now in case you need to restore later.
-Chris

LMWDP # 272

GDM528

#334: Post by GDM528 »

Auctor wrote:Certainly! But not 75g at a time in a fancy popcorn popper.
Has anybody tried this? This might end up on my 'to do" list. It could be hilarious, most expensive homemade popcorn evah. And since we're throwing popcorn shade, I'd point out that a drum roaster could be a pretty mean popcorn popper too...

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yakster
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#335: Post by yakster »

I did popcorn once in my Behmor. I put too much in and had to dig it out. It actually does really well at roasting almonds. I had two drums and dedicated one to almonds (the one with the bigger mesh size). There's no second crack with almonds.

I actually purchased my Behmor refurbished from the Chocolate Alchemist John Nanci, a friend of Joe Behm, who was advocating it's use in chocolate making.
-Chris

LMWDP # 272

GDM528

#336: Post by GDM528 »

mtbizzle wrote:Thanks for the reply! Is there a way to disable Android app updates?.. :?:
I think there is a way to disable updates in Android, but - and maybe it's just me - it seems like Google's instructions for how to configure their software is written for some other version - happens to me almost 100% of the time. So, for now I just say "no" to all update requests, and if I get really concerned, I can take the device off the network/cloud - only need Bluetooth to operate the roaster.

Cwilli62

#337: Post by Cwilli62 »

yakster wrote:I did popcorn once in my Behmor. I put too much in and had to dig it out. It actually does really well at roasting almonds. I had two drums and dedicated one to almonds (the one with the bigger mesh size). There's no second crack with almonds.
OT but yeah...myriad other uses out there. A local bean to bar chocolate shop uses a nice drum roaster to roast their cacao beans for the business.

On topic...I may be convinced to join the party and get a Home100 after reading through recent threads.

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MNate
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#338: Post by MNate »

GDM528 wrote:The thermodynamics of coffee roasting has been studied (by a Brazilian university, of course) and the thermal conductivity and diffusivity is known. So yeah, if you know the temperature just outside the bean you can calculate the temperature inside the bean, and the most appropriate unit for that delay would be seconds, not minutes.

Sorry for the bad pun, but measuring the internal temperature of the bean may not be as important as it's cracked up to be. De riguer for cooking the perfect steak involves soaking in a sous vide bath to a uniform temperature, then maillarding (just made that word up) the exterior very briefly under high heat. So there's two distinct levels the steak is cooked to, to create the desired blend of flavors. That seems analogous to the browning and development phases of coffee roasting. The Ikawa is so efficient at transferring heat into the beans, that I assert you can park them at whatever internal temperature you want in about 60 seconds, then brown the exterior to your liking.
It might help us to study a bit more roasting theory. I'm still very novice and many of the threads are over my head but I really enjoyed the thread in the Roasting FAQ section about roast profiles.

Another_jim has some good stuff, per usual:
wrote: Maybe "drying" is the wrong term, and iot shoub be more like "even heating to 300F." The symptoms of too short a dry phase are chlorogenioc acid tastes (green-bitter/bright) in the roast, especially it's a light one, and inadequate caramelization.

Two things happen between 300 and roughly 380F. First the Maillard reactions start, these turn sugars and amino acids into flavor compounds. Secondly, the remaining water in thebean turns to steam, starting at the center, where the pressure builds to around 15 bar and working outward in a coherent front (this from Illy). The energy required to create the high pressure steam depressed the temperature at the center of the bean. If the temperature of the coffee is not equalized before this it gets extreme by the time the fiorst crack is reached.

The first crack is the point where this steam fron breaks out of the bean. It is also the point where sugars begin to caramelize, and fruit acids, including the chlorogenic ones break down. Even in the best roasts, the beans become uneven at this point, and one wants to slow the roast, so the beans even out in color by the time the first crack starts slowing down. If this is done, one can stop the roast at any lightness with good results. If the temperature differencs are extreme, as in too fast a start, the beans never even out unless one bakes all the flavor out.

However, one can overdry the beans. Water is needed for the Maillard reactions and for caramelization, so a very dry bean will get flat. In the experiment where we pulled iudentical profiles for air and drum roasters, the air roasted beans tasted flatter (an effct only apparent experts, so quite subtle). This is why four to five minutes, maybe even three, is sufficinet for this stage in an airroaster, while one needs around 7 minutes in a drum.

The safes way is to initially roast the beans by sight, and keep them ibelow 300F until they all are a uniform yellow, but no longer than that. I thinkl 4 to 5 minute is about right for most airroasters, although 3 might be the ticket for very dry beans (say old crop ones), and 6 for excesively moist ones.
Jim Schulman
(The last paragraph there I think he is talking about the drying stage... maybe?)

Anyway, I'm very pleased with the precision of the roast levels the Ikawa Home produces, and tweaking with the stages to speed up or slow it down properly is what would make the advanced editor or all of you modding folks valuable. More reading and testing for sure!

Cwilli62

#339: Post by Cwilli62 »

Does anyone know how well the roaster does with cooler ambient temperatures? What is the coldest that the air temp can be and still have the roaster be effective?

Edit: Also, and please forgive my ignorance here, is it actually safe to roast indoors even with a "smokeless" roaster? Aren't there still potentially harmful gases being released during the roasting process?

(I ask these questions because I know I'll need to convince my partner to be allowed to roast indoors in the winter. And if I can't then I'll be playing with my new toy in the cold outdoors......)

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MNate
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#340: Post by MNate » replying to Cwilli62 »

With the Fresh Roast I could marginally roast inside under a good kitchen hood. My wife could still tell I had been roasting when she came home hours later - it smelled like a coffee shop. With the Ikawa Home I have done 1 or 2 batches inside without a hood and the smell mostly dissipates in a few hours, a slight coffee shop smell. I even showed a roasting process to some guests in our living room and I didn't feel uncomfortable about it. Under a hood you can't smell anything even as it's roasting.

So being able to roast indoors was a big factor for me, living here in Minnesota.

I can't attest to any potentially harmful byproducts though. And I really don't know why it doesn't smoke.

Adding: I'm not sure about convincing the spouse that this is anything more than a fun coffee gear thing though. It's probably not a cost saver. And while it does roast good coffee you can get as good from other sources. But I like it! And I think it looks good on the counter and isn't offensive.